1969 Plymouth Road Runner

Muscle Car In Detail

Book 5
CarTech Inc
5
Free sample

The late 1960s was an interesting time in the automotive world. Muscle cars, as we now know them, were well established, with all manufacturers joining the horsepower race. You could walk into the showroom for any brand from any manufacturer and find a variety of performance models. Competition being what it is, the manufacturers were looking for ways other than winning races to lure buyers into the showrooms and entice them to buy their products. Some tried to accomplish this with fancy marketing schemes and graphic paint packages and decals, and for the first time, some tried to win over buyers with price.

Volume No. 5 of CarTech's In Detail series covers the 1969 Plymouth Road Runner. It was an interesting marriage of a car that attempted to appeal to potential buyers with a low cost, light weight, and potent bare-bones package. It also added a brilliant marketing strategy of partnering with a famous studio and a popular cartoon character. The end result was a wildly popular, big-block, affordable muscle car with great graphics and a cool beep-beep horn. The public loved it.

All In Detail Series books include an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build-tag decoders, as well as production numbers.

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About the author

Wes Eisenschenk has successfully reunited dozens of enthusiasts with their lost cars through dedicated research and an unwavering attitude to never give up. In 2010, he located the original owner of his father's 1969 Impala SS 427 convertible, which was his catalyst for entering the world of automotive archeology. A collector car hobbyist himself, Eisenschenk enjoys showing his 1969 Plymouth Road Runner and 2001 Roush Mustang Stage 3 convertible all across Minnesota... when weather permits.

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Additional Information

Publisher
CarTech Inc
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Published on
Apr 17, 2017
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Pages
96
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ISBN
9781613253021
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Language
English
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Genres
Transportation / Automotive / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Pontiac ushered in the muscle car era when it introduced the mid-size 1964 GTO with a 389. So it was fitting that Pontiac made the last legitimate muscle cars of era: the 1973 and 1974 Trans Am Super Duty 455. As a second-gen F-Body car, the Trans Am featured refined styling, handling, and ride, but still retained brutish power. However, because of rising gas prices and insurance costs, these cars were not produced in great numbers, so they are extremely rare and valuable today.

In Volume No. 6 of CarTech's In Detail series, author Barry Kluczyk goes behind the scenes to reveal how a cadre of dedicated personnel at Pontiac refused to relinquish high-performance, forged ahead, and built the last great muscle car, the 1973 and 1974 Trans Am Super Duty 455. He retraces the design, development, and manufacture of each major component of the group. He also covers engine development and special equipment of the Super Duty 455 engine. In addition, covered are the high-performance chassis and suspension parts, so the TA could effectively apply and control all of the power.

All In Detail Series books include an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build-tag decoders, as well as production numbers.

By the mid-1960s, the American automotive market was yearning for faster, more responsive, and sportier cars, and a crew of high-performance enthusiasts at Pontiac recognized this. Large V-8s were commonly installed in full-size cars, but performance was hampered by pure chassis weight. Under the guidance of Bunkie Knudsen, John DeLorean, Bill Collins, and others, Pontiac installed the high-performance 389 V-8 into the nimble and lightweight intermediate-size LeMans chassis. It was a watershed moment for Pontiac; the 1964 GTO delivered astounding performance and created the muscle car blueprint that the Detroit manufacturers followed in the 1960s and 1970s.

This volume in the Muscle Cars In Detail Series delivers a comprehensive review of this trend-setting and historic car. The GTO housed a 389 V-8 engine with a single Carter AFB 4-barrel carburetor, and along with dual exhaust and 4-speed manual transmission, it supplied extraordinary performance. To improve traction and handling, the GTO was fitted with stiffer springs, limited-slip differential, larger-diameter front sway bar, and wider wheels. And to give it panache, the GTO was adorned with distinctive badges and a hood scoop. The 1964 GTO is a landmark car, and this book goes well beyond the glossy overview of other books about this car.

All In Detail Series books include an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build-tag decoders, as well as production numbers.

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There were Mustangs, and then there were Mustangs. Ford wanted its new little Pony Car to appeal to the masses, and in executing that plan, the Mustang could be had in anything from a plain-Jane version with an economical 6-cylinder engine (often referred to as a "secretary’s car"), all the way up to the sporty GT models with optional 271-hp V-8s. Unfortunately, although road-going Mustangs were considered sporty, they were not officially sports cars, at least according to the Sports Car Club of America (SCCA). And Lee Iacocca knew that on-track performance led to showroom performance, so he needed to go racing. Enter Carroll Shelby. Shelby worked with the SCCA to modify the Mustang to meet the SCCA's requirements and enter the racing arena. The result was the now-legendary Shelby Mustang.

This volume of CarTech's In Detail series covers the 1968 Shelby GT350, GT500, and GT500KR. In 1968, Ford sought to take over much of the process of producing Shelby Mustangs and increased that production dramatically to meet anticipated sales demand, so it was a bit of a transition year. In an effort to appeal to muscle car fans rather than race fans, the cars were losing their edgy race car feel and were becoming more high-end performance road cars with a long list of performance and comfort options including 428 Cobra Jet Engines, automatic transmissions, and air conditioning. They may have no longer been sports cars, but they  were now fantastic muscle cars. 

As in all In Detail Series books, you get an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build tag decoders, as well as production numbers.

Pontiac ushered in the muscle car era when it introduced the mid-size 1964 GTO with a 389. So it was fitting that Pontiac made the last legitimate muscle cars of era: the 1973 and 1974 Trans Am Super Duty 455. As a second-gen F-Body car, the Trans Am featured refined styling, handling, and ride, but still retained brutish power. However, because of rising gas prices and insurance costs, these cars were not produced in great numbers, so they are extremely rare and valuable today.

In Volume No. 6 of CarTech's In Detail series, author Barry Kluczyk goes behind the scenes to reveal how a cadre of dedicated personnel at Pontiac refused to relinquish high-performance, forged ahead, and built the last great muscle car, the 1973 and 1974 Trans Am Super Duty 455. He retraces the design, development, and manufacture of each major component of the group. He also covers engine development and special equipment of the Super Duty 455 engine. In addition, covered are the high-performance chassis and suspension parts, so the TA could effectively apply and control all of the power.

All In Detail Series books include an introduction and historical overview, an explanation of the design and concepts involved in creating the car, a look at marketing and promotion, and an in-depth study of all hardware and available options, as well as an examination of where the car is on the market today. Also included is an appendix of paint and option codes, VIN and build-tag decoders, as well as production numbers.

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