Natural Philosophy

The Floating Press
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Along with several collaborators, Russian-born chemist Wilhelm Ostwald is regarded as one of the key figures in developing the field now known as physical chemistry. In 1909, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on catalysis and several other key processes. In this comprehensive volume, Ostwald lays out a complete scientific system and relates it to many other topics, including cognition and probability.
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Additional Information

Publisher
The Floating Press
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Published on
Jul 1, 2014
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Pages
175
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ISBN
9781776584215
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Language
English
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Genres
Philosophy / General
Science / General
Science / Philosophy & Social Aspects
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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