Systems Analysis for Water Technology

Springer Science & Business Media
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This book has a rather long history. It goes back to 1980, when environmental engineering evolved from sanitary engineering as a new and broader engineering discipline. I had the assignment to teach a course in mathematical modeling of technical systems as part of a new postgraduate course in Urban Water Mana- ment and Water Pollution Control at ETH in Zurich. I decided to teach this course on a rather abstract level, with the goal of introducing methods that are generally applicable across the different disciplines of what was then defined as envir- mental engineering. Now I teach a graduate course in methods for urban water management, which heavily relies on the material I compiled in the 1980s. This course is offered in the first semester of the master education in environmental engineering at ETH; it requires four hours of lecturing and problem sessions a week during one semester. The students earn six credit units (ECTS). Of all the engineering disciplines, environmental engineering appears to be among those that maintain the most intimate contacts with the natural science disciplines. Only a detailed understanding of chemical, physical, and microbial processes will lead to engineered systems that fulfill the requirements of society and the environment and at the same time do not require excessive economic and natural resources.
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About the author

Prof. Dr. Willi Gujer received his first degree in Civil Engineering from ETH Zurich and later obtained his MS and PhD degrees in Sanitary Engineering from UC Berkeley. Until 1994 he was the head of the engineering department of Eawag (the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology). Since 1992 he has served as Professor for Urban Water Management at ETH Zurich. He has published more than 130 scientific papers and is listed as a highly cited author in environmental engineering. His primary research topic is the mathematical modelling of biological wastewater treatment.

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Additional Information

Springer Science & Business Media
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Published on
May 27, 2008
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Science / Earth Sciences / Meteorology & Climatology
Technology & Engineering / Civil / General
Technology & Engineering / Environmental / General
Technology & Engineering / Environmental / Water Supply
Technology & Engineering / Mechanical
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At the dawn of the twentieth century, a great confidence suffused America. Isaac Cline was one of the era's new men, a scientist who believed he knew all there was to know about the motion of clouds and the behavior of storms. The idea that a hurricane could damage the city of Galveston, Texas, where he was based, was to him preposterous, "an absurd delusion." It was 1900, a year when America felt bigger and stronger than ever before. Nothing in nature could hobble the gleaming city of Galveston, then a magical place that seemed destined to become the New York of the Gulf.

That August, a strange, prolonged heat wave gripped the nation and killed scores of people in New York and Chicago. Odd things seemed to happen everywhere: A plague of crickets engulfed Waco. The Bering Glacier began to shrink. Rain fell on Galveston with greater intensity than anyone could remember. Far away, in Africa, immense thunderstorms blossomed over the city of Dakar, and great currents of wind converged. A wave of atmospheric turbulence slipped from the coast of western Africa. Most such waves faded quickly. This one did not.

In Cuba, America's overconfidence was made all too obvious by the Weather Bureau's obsession with controlling hurricane forecasts, even though Cuba's indigenous weathermen had pioneered hurricane science. As the bureau's forecasters assured the nation that all was calm in the Caribbean, Cuba's own weathermen fretted about ominous signs in the sky. A curious stillness gripped Antigua. Only a few unlucky sea captains discovered that the storm had achieved an intensity no man alive had ever experienced.

In Galveston, reassured by Cline's belief that no hurricane could seriously damage the city, there was celebration. Children played in the rising water. Hundreds of people gathered at the beach to marvel at the fantastically tall waves and gorgeous pink sky, until the surf began ripping the city's beloved beachfront apart. Within the next few hours Galveston would endure a hurricane that to this day remains the nation's deadliest natural disaster. In Galveston alone at least 6,000 people, possibly as many as 10,000, would lose their lives, a number far greater than the combined death toll of the Johnstown Flood and 1906 San Francisco Earthquake.

And Isaac Cline would experience his own unbearable loss.

Meticulously researched and vividly written, Isaac's Storm is based on Cline's own letters, telegrams, and reports, the testimony of scores of survivors, and our latest understanding of the hows and whys of great storms. Ultimately, however, it is the story of what can happen when human arrogance meets nature's last great uncontrollable force. As such, Isaac's Storm carries a warning for our time.

From the Hardcover edition.
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