Virginia at War, 1865

University Press of Kentucky
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By January 1865, most of VirginiaÕs schools were closed, many newspapers had ceased publication, businesses suffered, and food was scarce. Having endured major defeats on their home soil and the loss of much of the stateÕs territory to the Union army, VirginiaÕs Confederate soldiers began to desert at higher rates than at any other time in the war, returning home to provide their families with whatever assistance they could muster. It was a dark year for Virginia. Virginia at War, 1865 closely examines the end of the Civil War in the Old Dominion, delivering a striking depiction of a state ravaged by violence and destruction. In the final volume of the Virginia at War series, editors William C. Davis and James I. Robertson Jr. have once again assembled an impressive collection of essays covering topics that include land operations, women and families, wartime economy, music and entertainment, the demobilization of LeeÕs army, and the warÕs aftermath. The volume ends with the final installment of Judith Brockenbrough McGuireÕs popular and important Diary of a Southern Refugee during the War. Like the previous four volumes in the series, Virginia at War, 1865 provides valuable insights into the devastating effects of the war on citizens across the state.
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About the author

William C. Davis, professor of history and director of programs at Virginia Tech’s Virginia Center for Civil War Studies, is the author of Lincoln’s Men: How President Lincoln Became Father to an Army and a Nation. He lives in Blacksburg, Virginia. James I. Robertson Jr., Alumni Distinguished Professor of History at Virginia Tech and director of the Virginia Center for Civil War Studies, is the author of Stonewall Jackson: The Man, the Soldier, the Legend. He lives in Blacksburg, Virginia.

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Additional Information

Publisher
University Press of Kentucky
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Published on
Jan 1, 2012
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9780813134697
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / Civil War Period (1850-1877)
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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A riveting historical narrative of the heart-stopping events surrounding the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and the first work of history from mega-bestselling author Bill O'Reilly

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As the Civil War entered its first full calendar year for the Old Dominion, Virginians began to experience the full ramifications of the conflict. Their expectations for the coming year did not prepare them for what was about to happen; in 1862 the war became earnest and real, and the state became then and thereafter the major battleground of the war in the East. Virginia emerged from the year 1861 in much the same state of uncertainty and confusion as the rest of the Confederacy. While the North was known to be rebuilding its army, no one could be sure if the northern people and government were willing to continue the war. The landscape and the people of Virginia were a part of the battlefield. Virginia at War, 1862 demonstrates how no aspect of life in the Commonwealth escaped the warÕs impact. The collection of essays examines topics as diverse as daily civilian life and the effects of military occupation, the massive influx of tens of thousands of wounded and sick into Richmond, and the wartime expansion of VirginiaÕs industrial base, the largest in the Confederacy. Out on the field, Robert E. LeeÕs army was devastated by the Battle of Antietam, and Lee strove to rebuild the army with recruits from the interior of the state. Many Virginians, however, were far behind the front lines. A growing illustrated press brought the war into the homes of civilians and allowed them to see what was happening in their state and in the larger war beyond their borders. To round out this volume, indefatigable Richmond diarist Judith McGuire continues her day-by-day reflections on life during wartime. The second in a five-volume series examining each year of the war, Virginia at War, 1862 illuminates the happenings on both homefront and battlefield in the state that served as the crucible of AmericaÕs greatest internal conflict.
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