Journey Out Returning

Troubador Publishing Ltd
Free sample

Journey Out Returning is a street-life story of struggle, sexual discovery, friendship and community told within the 1960s, a decade of ‘flower-power’ and ‘love-ins’. Set against a background of the music of the Beatles “Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”; The Small Faces “Itchycoo Park”, the bursting forth of Pink Floyd and many other bands and singers, William Fell-Holden’s memoir captures his personal history and links this to the major events of the decade. William recounts a time of youthful bliss, taking readers on a journey of self-discovery to his past to find a core meaning in his life. He recalls how the 1960s gave its mark of joy, freedom and mind-expansion; imaginations eagerly feeding from a feast of new ideas, all hopeful and colourful for a new world of peace, pleasure and love. Travelling back to the county of William’s birth, on the Fylde coast of Lancashire, readers will find a story of friendships and a community of people that helped William to regain his strength after an emotional collapse. Just as the decade was split apart by the assassination of John F. Kennedy, William’s is a life of two halves. Based entirely within the 1960s, William’s memoir is written with diary-like immediacy with the spirit of the decade. William captures the soul and social detail of the time within his story, offering readers the opportunity to experience the time and place through his authentic accounts. Journey Out Returning will appeal to readers that enjoy memoirs, as well as those interested in the 1960s.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Troubador Publishing Ltd
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Published on
Oct 28, 2017
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Pages
200
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ISBN
9781788030823
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / General
Biography & Autobiography / Personal Memoirs
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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