Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America

Brookings Institution Press
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At its optimistic best, America has embraced its identity as the world's melting pot. Today it is on the cusp of becoming a country with no racial majority, and new minorities are poised to exert a profound impact on U.S. society, economy, and politics. The concept of a "minority white" may instill fear among some Americans, but William H. Frey, the man behind the demographic research, points out that demography is destiny, and the fear of a more racially diverse nation will almost certainly dissipate over time.

Through a compelling narrative and eye-catching charts and maps, eminent demographer Frey interprets and expounds on the dramatic growth of minority populations in the United States. He finds that without these expanding groups, America could face a bleak future: this new generation of young minorities, who are having children at a faster rate than whites, is infusing our aging labor force with vitality and innovation. In contrast with the labor force-age population of Japan, Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom, the U.S. labor force-age population is set to grow 5 percent by 2030.

Diversity Explosion shares the good news about diversity in the coming decades, and the more globalized, multiracial country that the U.S. is becoming.

Contents

A Pivotal Period for Race in America

Old versus Young: Cultural Generation Gaps

America's New Racial Map

Hispanics Fan Out: Who Goes Where?

Asians in America: The Newest Minority Surge

The Great Migration of Blacks—In Reverse

White Population Shifts—A Zero-Sum

Melting Pot Cities and Suburbs

Neighborhood Segregation: Toward a New Racial Paradigm

Multiracial Marriages and Multiracial America

Race and Politics: Expanding the Battleground

America on the Cusp

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About the author

William H. Frey is a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy program at the Brookings Institution and Research Professor in Population Studies at the University of Michigan. An internationally regarded demographer, his research has been written about in The Economist, New Yorker, and New York Times Magazine. Known for his ability to communicate demographic trends, he is a frequent commentator on broadcast media.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
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Published on
Nov 19, 2014
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9780815723998
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Demography
Social Science / Discrimination & Race Relations
Social Science / Emigration & Immigration
Social Science / Social Classes & Economic Disparity
Social Science / Statistics
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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