Deadly Darlings: The Horrifying True Accounts of Children Turned Into Murderers

Absolute Crime
29
Free sample

If you've ever thought your child was bad, then you haven't seen
anything yet! In the pages that follow, you are about to meet some of
the most vicious children who ever lived.

The kids in this book
are as young as ten-years-old and they are ruthless. The nice ones
killed in cold blood—but many of these kids weren’t nice…they wanted
their victims to suffer.

Some were turned killers by their brutal
home environments; others were just inherently evil. They were all
deadly darlings you’d never want to meet on the street.
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Reviews

3.9
29 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
Absolute Crime
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Published on
Oct 10, 2013
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Pages
152
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Language
English
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Genres
Reference / Encyclopedias
True Crime / Murder / Serial Killers
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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Vincent Bugliosi
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Burnham overcame tremendous obstacles and tragedies as he organized the talents of Frederick Law Olmsted, Charles McKim, Louis Sullivan, and others to transform swampy Jackson Park into the White City, while Holmes used the attraction of the great fair and his own satanic charms to lure scores of young women to their deaths. What makes the story all the more chilling is that Holmes really lived, walking the grounds of that dream city by the lake.

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To find out more about this book, go to http://www.DevilInTheWhiteCity.com.
Anthony Flacco
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