The Narrative of William Wells Brown, A Fugitive Slave

Sold by Simon and Schuster
1
Free sample

Thirteen years ago, I came to your door, a weary fugitive from chains and stripes. I was a stranger, and you took me in. I was hungry, and you fed me. Naked was I, and you clothed me. Even a name by which to be known among men, slavery had denied me. You bestowed upon me your own. Base indeed should I be, if I ever forget what I owe to you, or do anything to disgrace that honored name!
Read more
Collapse
5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Simon and Schuster
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 28, 2012
Read more
Collapse
Pages
67
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781625584700
Read more
Collapse
Features
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Cultural, Ethnic & Regional / General
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
"Twenty-Two Years a Slave, and Forty Years a Freeman" is a slave narrative, detailing Austin Steward's early life of enslavement and escape, as well as his years of freedom and work at Wilber force Colony. Austin Steward (1793 – 1869) was an African-American abolitionist and author. He was born a slave and escaped from Virginia at about age 21, settling in Rochester, New York, and then Canada. Contents: Slave Life on the Plantation At the Great House Horse-racing and Its Consequences Journey to Our New Home in New York Incidents at Sodus Bay Removal From Sodus to Bath Dueling Horse-racing and General Training Death Bed and Bridal Scenes Hired Out to a New Master Thoughts on Freedom Capt. Helm — Divorce — Kidnapping Locate in the Village of Rochester Incidents in Rochester and Vicinity Sad Reverses of Capt. Helm British Emancipation of Slavery Oration — Termination of Slavery Condition of Free Colored People Persecution of the Colored People Removal to Canada Roughing It in the Wilds of Canada Narrow Escape of a Smuggler Narrative of Two Fugitives From Virginia Pleasant Re-union of Old and Tried Friends Private Losses and Private Difficulties Incidents and Peculiarities of the Indians Our Difficulties With Israel Lewis Desperation of a Fugitive Slave A Narrow Escape From My Enemies Death of B. Paul, and Return of His Brother My Family Return to Rochester The Land Agent and the Squatter Character and Death of I. Lewis My Return to Rochester Bishop Brown — Death of My Daughter Celebration of the First of August Correspondence Letter From A. Steward to Wm. L. Garrison
A well-known nineteenth-century abolitionist and former slave, William Wells Brown was a prolific writer and lecturer who captivated audiences with readings of his drama The Escape; or, a Leap for Freedom (1858). The first published play by an African American writer, The Escape explored the complexities of American culture at a time when tensions between North and South were about to explode into the Civil War. This new volume presents the first-edition text of Brown's play and features an extensive introduction that establishes the work's continuing significance.

The Escape centers on the attempted sexual violation of a slave and involves many characters of mixed race, through which Brown commented on such themes as moral decay, white racism, and black self-determination. Rich in action and faithful in dialect, it raises issues relating not only to race but also to gender by including concepts of black and white masculinity and the culture of southern white and enslaved women. It portrays a world in which slavery provided a convenient means of distinguishing between the white North and the white South, allowing northerners to express moral sentiments without recognizing or addressing the racial prejudice pervasive among whites in both regions.

John Ernest's introductory essay balances the play's historical and literary contexts, including information on Brown and his career, as well as on slavery, abolitionism, and sectional politics. It also discusses the legends and realities of the Underground Railroad, examines the role of antebellum performance art -- including blackface minstrelsy and stage versions of Uncle Tom's Cabin -- in the construction of race and national identity,and provides an introduction to theories of identity as performance.

A century and a half after its initial appearance, The Escape remains essential reading for students of African American literature. Ernest's keen analysis of this classic play will enrich readers' appreciation of both the drama itself and the era in which it appeared.

©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.