Professional Communication: Collaboration between Academics and Practitioners

Hong Kong University Press
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Professional Communication presents ten studies of communication practices in a variety of professional contexts. By drawing on diverse methodologies from fields such as conversation analysis, intercultural communication, and organizational studies, the essays here examine how language is constructed, managed, and consumed in various professional situations, ranging from academic settings to business negotiations. One important theme of the book is its emphasis on the collaboration between researchers and professionals. The contributors strongly believe that such collaborative partnership will provide direct implications for improving workplace communication and enhance better understanding of the construction of professional identity and organizational behaviour.
 
This book will appeal to not only scholars and researchers in discourse analysis, intercultural communication and professional studies, but also practitioners in the related fields and disciplines.

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About the author

Kenneth C. C. Kong is an associate professor in the Department of English Language and Literature at Hong Kong Baptist University. His main research interests include discourse analysis, intercultural pragmatics, multi-modal analysis, English for specific purposes, functional linguistics, and language education.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Hong Kong University Press
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Published on
Apr 1, 2009
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Pages
256
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ISBN
9789622099654
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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James W. Heisig
The aim of this book is to provide the student of Japanese with a simple method for correlating the writing and the meaning of Japanese characters in such a way as to make them both easy to remember. It is intended not only for the beginner, but also for the more advanced student looking for some relief from the constant frustration of how to write the kanji and some way to systematize what he or she already knows. The author begins with writing because--contrary to first impressions--it is in fact the simpler of the two. He abandons the traditional method of ordering the kanji according to their frequency of use and organizes them according to their component parts or "primitive elements." Assigning each of these parts a distinct meaning with its own distinct image, the student is led to harness the powers of "imaginative memory" to learn the various combinations that result. In addition, each kanji is given its own key word to represent the meaning, or one of the principal meanings, of that character. These key words provide the setting for a particular kanji's "story," whose protagonists are the primitive elements. In this way, students are able to complete in a few short months a task that would otherwise take years. Armed with the same skills as Chinese or Korean students, who know the meaning and writing of the kanji but not their pronunciation in Japanese, they are now in a much better position to learn to read (which is treated in a separate volume). For further information and a sample of the contents, visit http: ///www.nanzan-u.ac.jp/SHUBUNKEN/publications/miscPublications/Remembering_the_Kanji_l.htm.
Franca Poppi
Globalization, i.e. the spatio-temporal processes of change leading to a transformation in the organization of human affairs, is said to have started as long ago as the end of the 15th century. This first wave of globalization was subsequently followed by two others. The third wave of globalization, which began after 2000, has made the world noticeably smaller. In fact, technological innovations have sharply increased the availability of new modes and channels of communication. As a result, the sharing of knowledge and information all around the world has substantially increased and this has prompted the emergence of new ‘globalizing genres’. In addition, it has led to the implementation of a series of adaptations to the existing genres, in an attempt to guarantee their success and survival in an era which celebrates the need for a ‘global reach’.

In order to investigate these ‘winds of change’ in generic studies, the present volume combines a historical perspective with a detailed survey of different contemporary discourses and genres situated in an array of contexts of interaction. Accordingly, the empirically informed analyses of discourses and genres do not only focus on the textual, intertextual and interdiscursive features, but also on the institutional, organizational, professional and socio-cultural settings, i.e. all those aspects which show how genres reflect changing disciplinary and professional cultures.

As a consequence, and in line with the multi-faceted nature of genre, different reading paths can be followed in the present volume. On the one hand, it is possible to make a distinction between professional, institutional and academic contexts. On the other hand, the concept of change will also be investigated by focusing on oral, written and web-mediated genres. Throughout the volume, the different reading paths aim at highlighting the influence of the three waves of globalization on genre evolution, thus contributing to providing evidence in favour of the homogenization or fragmentation hypotheses, which claim new ‘global genres’ are outnumbering, or are outnumbered by, the proliferation of a myriad of new, customized genres.

Franca Poppi
Globalization, i.e. the spatio-temporal processes of change leading to a transformation in the organization of human affairs, is said to have started as long ago as the end of the 15th century. This first wave of globalization was subsequently followed by two others. The third wave of globalization, which began after 2000, has made the world noticeably smaller. In fact, technological innovations have sharply increased the availability of new modes and channels of communication. As a result, the sharing of knowledge and information all around the world has substantially increased and this has prompted the emergence of new ‘globalizing genres’. In addition, it has led to the implementation of a series of adaptations to the existing genres, in an attempt to guarantee their success and survival in an era which celebrates the need for a ‘global reach’.

In order to investigate these ‘winds of change’ in generic studies, the present volume combines a historical perspective with a detailed survey of different contemporary discourses and genres situated in an array of contexts of interaction. Accordingly, the empirically informed analyses of discourses and genres do not only focus on the textual, intertextual and interdiscursive features, but also on the institutional, organizational, professional and socio-cultural settings, i.e. all those aspects which show how genres reflect changing disciplinary and professional cultures.

As a consequence, and in line with the multi-faceted nature of genre, different reading paths can be followed in the present volume. On the one hand, it is possible to make a distinction between professional, institutional and academic contexts. On the other hand, the concept of change will also be investigated by focusing on oral, written and web-mediated genres. Throughout the volume, the different reading paths aim at highlighting the influence of the three waves of globalization on genre evolution, thus contributing to providing evidence in favour of the homogenization or fragmentation hypotheses, which claim new ‘global genres’ are outnumbering, or are outnumbered by, the proliferation of a myriad of new, customized genres.

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