What Works May Hurt—Side Effects in Education

Teachers College Press
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Yong Zhao shines a light on the long-ignored phenomenon of side effects of education policies and practices, bringing a fresh and perhaps surprising perspective to evidence-based practices and policies. Identifying the adverse effects of some of the “best” educational interventions with examples from classrooms to boardrooms, the author investigates causes and offers clear recommendations.

“A highly readable and important book about the side effects of education reforms. Every educator and researcher should take its lessons to heart.”
—Diane Ravitch, New York University

“A stunning analysis of the problems encountered in our efforts to improve education. If Yong Zhao has not delivered the death blow to naive empiricism, he has at least severely wounded it.”
—Gene V. Glass, San José State University

“This book is a brilliantly written analysis of well-known educational change efforts followed by a concrete call for action that no policymaker, researcher, teacher, or education reform advocate should leave unread.”
—Pasi Sahlberg, University of New South Wales, Sydney

“Nothing less than the future of the republic is dealt with in this wonderful and crucial book about the field of educational research and policy.”
—David C. Berliner, Arizona State University

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Additional Information

Publisher
Teachers College Press
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Published on
Dec 31, 2018
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Pages
167
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ISBN
9780807776902
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Educational Policy & Reform / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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