(Multi) Media Translation: Concepts, practices, and research

John Benjamins Publishing
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The globalisation of communication networks has increased the domains of translation and is challenging ever more the translator’s role. This volume is a collection of contributions from two different conferences (Misano, 1997 and Berlin, 1998). (Multi)Media translation, especially screen translation (TV, cinema, video), has made more explicit the complexities of any communication and has led us to take a fresh look at the translator’s strategies and behaviours.Several papers ponder the concepts of media and multimedia, the necessity of interdisciplinarity, the polysemiotic dimension of audiovisual media. Quite a few discuss the current transformations in audiovisual media policy. A great many deal with practices, mainly in subtitling but also in interpreting for TV and surtitling: what are the quality parameters and the conditions to meet audience’s expectations?
Finally some show the cultural and linguistic implications of screen translation. Digitalisation is changing production and broadcasting and speeding up convergence between media, telecommunications and information and communication technology.
Is (multi)media translation a new field of study or an umbrella framework for scholars from various disciplines? Is it a trick to overcome the absence of prestige in Translation Studies? Or is it just a buzz word which gives rise to confusion? These questions remain open: the 26 contributions are partial answers.
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John Benjamins Publishing
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Sep 6, 2001
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Language Arts & Disciplines / Translating & Interpreting
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The late twentieth-century transition from a paper-oriented to a media-oriented society has triggered the emergence of Audiovisual Translation as the most dynamic and fastest developing trend within Translation Studies. The growing interest in this area is a clear indication that this discipline is going to set the agenda for the theory, research, training and practice of translation in the twenty-first century. Even so, this remains a largely underdeveloped field and much needs to be done to put Screen Translation, Multimedia Translation or the wider implications of Audiovisual Translation on a par with other fields within Translation Studies. In this light, this collection of essays reflects not only the “state of the art” in the research and teaching of Audiovisual Translation, but also the professionals’ experiences. The different contributions cover issues ranging from reflections on professional activities, to theory, the impact of ideology on Audiovisual Translation, and the practices of teaching and researching this new and challenging discipline.In expanding further the ground covered by the John Benjamins’ book (Multi)Media Translation (2001), this book seeks to provide readers with a deeper insight into some of the specific concepts, problems, aims and terminology of Audiovisual Translation, and, by this token, to make these specificities emerge from within the wider nexus of Translation Studies, Film Studies and Media Studies. In a quickly developing technical audiovisual world, Audiovisual Translation Studies is set to become the academic field that will address the complex cultural issues of a pervasively media-oriented society.
A New York Times Notable Book for 2011
One of The Economist's 2011 Books of the Year

People speak different languages, and always have. The Ancient Greeks took no notice of anything unless it was said in Greek; the Romans made everyone speak Latin; and in India, people learned their neighbors' languages—as did many ordinary Europeans in times past (Christopher Columbus knew Italian, Portuguese, and Castilian Spanish as well as the classical languages). But today, we all use translation to cope with the diversity of languages. Without translation there would be no world news, not much of a reading list in any subject at college, no repair manuals for cars or planes; we wouldn't even be able to put together flat-pack furniture.

Is That a Fish in Your Ear? ranges across the whole of human experience, from foreign films to philosophy, to show why translation is at the heart of what we do and who we are. Among many other things, David Bellos asks: What's the difference between translating unprepared natural speech and translating Madame Bovary? How do you translate a joke? What's the difference between a native tongue and a learned one? Can you translate between any pair of languages, or only between some? What really goes on when world leaders speak at the UN? Can machines ever replace human translators, and if not, why?

But the biggest question Bellos asks is this: How do we ever really know that we've understood what anybody else says—in our own language or in another? Surprising, witty, and written with great joie de vivre, this book is all about how we comprehend other people and shows us how, ultimately, translation is another name for the human condition.

As a meaningful manifestation of how institutionalized the discipline has become, the new Handbook of Translation Studies is most welcome. It joins the other signs of maturation such as Summer Schools, the development of academic curricula, historical surveys, journals, book series, textbooks, terminologies, bibliographies and encyclopedias.
The HTS aims at disseminating knowledge about translation and interpreting and providing easy access to a large range of topics, traditions, and methods to a relatively broad audience: not only students who often adamantly prefer such user-friendliness, researchers and lecturers in Translation Studies, Translation & Interpreting professionals; but also scholars and experts from other disciplines (among which linguistics, sociology, history, psychology). In addition the HTS addresses any of those with a professional or personal interest in the problems of translation, interpreting, localization, editing, etc., such as communication specialists, journalists, literary critics, editors, public servants, business managers, (intercultural) organization specialists, media specialists, marketing professionals.
The usability, accessibility and flexibility of the HTS depend on the commitment of people who agree that Translation Studies does matter. All users are therefore invited to share their feedback. Any questions, remarks and suggestions for improvement can be sent to the editorial team at hts@kuleuven.be.
Next to the book edition (in printed and electronic, PDF, format), HTS is also available as an online resource, connected with the Translation Studies Bibliography. For access to the Handbook of Translation Studies Online, please visit http://www.benjamins.com/online/hts/
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