The Bookmakers

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Just when he finally comes up with a fabulous idea for a novel about a burnt-out writer who decides to commit suicide, Mack Green discovers that his publisher, who thinks that the book works better as nonfiction, has hired a hit man to insure that idea.
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About the author

Ze’ev Chafets is the author of eight works of nonfiction, including the Jewish travelogue Members of the Tribe, and four novels. He was born in Pontiac, Michigan, and now lives in New York City, where he is a frequent contributor to the New York Times Magazine and New York Daily News.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Random House
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Published on
Nov 30, 2011
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Pages
261
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ISBN
9780307799739
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Humorous / General
Fiction / Mystery & Detective / General
Fiction / Mystery & Detective / International Mystery & Crime
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Do you remember your first time?

People tend to remember the moment they first heard The Rush Limbaugh Show on the radio. For Zev Chafets, it was in a car in Detroit, driving down Woodward Avenue. Limbaugh's braggadocio, the outrageous satire, the slaughtering of liberal sacred cows performed with the verve of a rock-n-roll DJ-it seemed fresh, funny and completely subversive. "They're never going to let this guy stay on the air," he thought.

Almost two decades later Chafets met Rush for the first time, at Limbaugh's rarely visited "Southern Command." They spent hours together talking on the record about politics, sports, music, show business, religion and modern American history. Rush opened his home and his world, introducing Chafets to his family, closest friends, even his psychologist. The result was an acclaimed cover-story profile of Limbaugh in The New York Times Magazine.

But there was much more to say, especially after Limbaugh became Public Enemy Number One of the Obama Administration. At first Limbaugh resisted the idea of a full-length portrait, but he eventually invited Chafets back to Florida and exchanged more than a hundred emails full of his personal history, thoughts, fears and ambitions. What has emerged is an uniquely personal look at the man who is not only the most popular voice on the radio, but the leader of the conservative movement and one of the most influential figures in the Republican Party.

While Limbaugh's public persona is instantly recognizable, his background and private life are often misunderstood. Even devoted Dittoheads will find there's a lot they don't know about the self-described "harmless little fuzzball" who has, over the years, taken on the giants of the mainstream media and the Democratic Party-from Bill and Hillary Clinton to Barack Obama-with "half his brain tied behind his back, just to make it fair." Chafets paints a compelling portrait of Limbaugh as a master entertainer, a public intellectual, a political force, and a fascinating man.
A national bestseller offering an inside look at the founder and former head of Fox News
 
Roger Ailes is the quintessential man behind the curtain. He more or less invented modern politi­cal consulting and helped Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George H. W. Bush win their races for the White House. Then he reinvented himself as a master of cable television, first as the head of CNBC and, since 1996, as the creator and leader of Fox News, the most influential news network in the country.
 
To liberals, Ailes is an evil genius who helped polarize the country by breaking the mainstream media’s long monopoly on what constitutes news. To conservatives, he’s a champion of free speech and fair reporting whose values and view of Amer­ica reflect their own. But no one doubts that Ailes has transformed journalism. Barack Obama once called him “the most powerful man in America”— and given that Fox News has changed the way millions understand the world, it may be true.
 
Yet for all that fame and infamy, very few people know the real person behind the headlines.
 
Journalist Zev Chafets received unprecedented access to Ailes and his family, friends, and Fox News colleagues. The result is a candid, compelling portrait of a fascinating man. We see Ailes in action at Fox News and hear him reflect on personal mat­ters he has never before discussed publicly. And we discover the heart of his sometimes surprising political beliefs: his profane piety and his unwav­ering belief in the values of his small-town Ohio boyhood.
 
Ailes loves to fight, but he is a happy warrior who has somehow managed to charm and befriend many of the people he has defeated in political campaigns and television wars. Barbara Walters, Rachel Maddow, Jesse Jackson, the Kennedy clan— all are unexpected Ailes fans.
 
Chafets also gives us an unprecedented look at the inner workings of Fox News and explores Ailes’s relationships with Bill O’Reilly, Sean Hannity, Megyn Kelly, Neil Cavuto, Chris Wallace, and the other stars he has nurtured.
 
Ultimately, Ailes is neither villain nor hero but a man full of contradictions and surprises. As Chafets writes, “What will he do next? What stokes his competitive fires and occasional rages? How to reconcile his acts of exceptional loyalty and pri­vate generosity (even to rivals) with his impulse to present himself to the world as a ruthless leg breaker? What makes Roger run—and where, if anywhere, is the finish line? As Ailes himself might say: I report, you decide.”


From the Hardcover edition.
“[A] hilarious, warm look at one of organized crime’s oft-neglected ethnic groups.”—The New York Times Book Review

William Gordon’s dear Uncle Max is dead. Dear, crooked, murderous, notorious Mafioso kingpin Uncle Max. But Pulitzer-winning foreign correspondent Gordon always knew Uncle Max to be generous. Now, even in death, Uncle Max comes through, for he leaves Gordon millions—in the form of a Mafia territory.

The only catch is that Gordon, the cultured journalist, might have to fight to retain his piece of the mob. On the other hand, who wouldn’t fight for half a billion dollars? But can an educated Jewish reporter who regularly rubs shoulders with world leaders really succeed as a semi-don? Maybe—if he’s greedy enough, and not afraid to get his hands dirty or bloody. . . .

Praise for Inherit the Mob

“I can’t think of two professions that more richly deserve each other than journalism and organized crime. Zev Chafets does an honor to them both.”—Carl Hiaasen, author of Native Tongue

“If you think there’s nothing funny about organized crime, pick up a copy of Inherit the Mob. Zev Chafets makes his fictional debut in this sidesplitting spoof of Mafia family matters, manners, and misadventures. . . . Chafets has perfect pitch for dialogue and an eye for vivid, unforgettable characters.”—The Cleveland Plain Dealer

“Lively entertainment.”—Chicago Tribune

“A full-fledged romp bursting with energy, good humor, and plot curlicues aplenty.”—The Detroit News


The perfect gift for graduates – thirty commencement addresses about liberty, patriotism, tradition, and other conservative themes that are rarely heard on campus.

The college graduation speech has become another casualty of our age of political correctness. Historically, universities are supposed to be strongholds of tolerance, where any idea can be discussed--and tested rigorously to see if it has merit. Students should benefit from free expression and diversity of opinions, about current events and eternal questions alike.

But today, certain positions are considered too controversial for the fragile ears of liberal students, and for administrators who usually surrender to their demands. It’s no longer unusual when a U.S. Senator like Ted Cruz, a pioneering neurosurgeon like Ben Carson, a Supreme Court Justice like Antonin Scalia, or a human rights advocate like Ayaan Hirsi Ali faces protests, disrespectful shouting, or petitions to have his or her invitation revoked.

Fortunately, Remembering Who We Are collects the commencement wisdom of a wide range of thinkers who are willing to challenge the liberal consensus on campus. Editor Zev Chafets has brought together a diverse group of speakers from many walks of life, from playwright David Mamet to Ambassador Ryan Crocker, from Governor Bobby Jindal to humorist PJ O’Rourke. For example, you’ll find in these pages:

   •  “Do Your Best to Be Your Best” by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas
   •  “Gridlock, An American Achievement” by columnist George F. Will
   •  “We Have Something Wonderful” by novelist Marilynne Robinson
   •   “The Art of the Entrepreneur” by business leader Mort Zuckerman
   •   “Restore and Remake Our Country” by historian Victor Davis Hanson

Too many students now enter the real world after being taught that patriotism is misguided, that religious faith is for the foolish, and that free enterprise is unfair. The eloquent speeches in this collection will help them grasp the truth – that America is flawed but fundamentally good; that faith can have intellectual depth; that capitalism is the world’s greatest force for fighting poverty; and much more.


From the Hardcover edition.
Do you remember your first time?

People tend to remember the moment they first heard The Rush Limbaugh Show on the radio. For Zev Chafets, it was in a car in Detroit, driving down Woodward Avenue. Limbaugh's braggadocio, the outrageous satire, the slaughtering of liberal sacred cows performed with the verve of a rock-n-roll DJ-it seemed fresh, funny and completely subversive. "They're never going to let this guy stay on the air," he thought.

Almost two decades later Chafets met Rush for the first time, at Limbaugh's rarely visited "Southern Command." They spent hours together talking on the record about politics, sports, music, show business, religion and modern American history. Rush opened his home and his world, introducing Chafets to his family, closest friends, even his psychologist. The result was an acclaimed cover-story profile of Limbaugh in The New York Times Magazine.

But there was much more to say, especially after Limbaugh became Public Enemy Number One of the Obama Administration. At first Limbaugh resisted the idea of a full-length portrait, but he eventually invited Chafets back to Florida and exchanged more than a hundred emails full of his personal history, thoughts, fears and ambitions. What has emerged is an uniquely personal look at the man who is not only the most popular voice on the radio, but the leader of the conservative movement and one of the most influential figures in the Republican Party.

While Limbaugh's public persona is instantly recognizable, his background and private life are often misunderstood. Even devoted Dittoheads will find there's a lot they don't know about the self-described "harmless little fuzzball" who has, over the years, taken on the giants of the mainstream media and the Democratic Party-from Bill and Hillary Clinton to Barack Obama-with "half his brain tied behind his back, just to make it fair." Chafets paints a compelling portrait of Limbaugh as a master entertainer, a public intellectual, a political force, and a fascinating man.
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