Biblical Greek

Subsidia Biblica

Book 41
Gregorian Biblical BookShop
2
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The success which attended the Latin “Graecitas Biblica” from its first (1944) to its revised and enlarged fourth Edition (1960) suggested the advisability of an English translation. The purpose of the present treatise was not so much a purely scientific or philological one, as that of encouraging future ministers of the Word to have recourse to the original Greek text. This accounts for the multiplication of examples to illustrate the exegetical importance of the study of the Greek and also for the fact that attention has been given almost exclusively to points of syntax, morphology being relegated to a few remarks in the Conclusion (M. Zerwick S.J.).
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About the author

 Fr. Max Zerwick (1901-1975), a Bavarian, had obtained doctorates in theology at Innsbruck and in classical philology at Vienna when he, too, arrived at Biblical Institute in 1936. As from 1937 he taught biblical Greek. He published here his Vienna thesis Untersuchungen zum Markusstil.

Fr. Joseph P. Smith (1912-1964) an Englishman from Lancashire. He had studied classic at London from 1958-1941. He arrived at Biblical Institute in 1947 to do the licentiate in orientalism and obtained it in 1950.
From 1951 until 1962 he not only taught the course in textual criticism, thus relieving Fr. Vogt, but also the courses in Armenian and Georgian languages and literatures. His chief publications were, firstly, St. Irenaeus, Proof of the apostolic Teaching (Ancient Christian Wrtiters, 16), Westminster Md - London 1952, which gave the translation of, and a commentary on, the Armenian Text nd, secondly, Biblical Greek, which was published at the Institute and was a reworked translation of Fr. Zerwick’s Grammar of New Testament Greek. His field was mainly biblical history and, more precisely, the chronology of the kings of Israel and Juda. At different times he taught Aramaic, Syriac and Arabic.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Gregorian Biblical BookShop
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Published on
Dec 1, 1962
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Pages
352
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ISBN
9788876535543
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Linguistics / General
Language Arts & Disciplines / Study & Teaching
Religion / Biblical Criticism & Interpretation / General
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In this volume the reader will find the articles that constituted important advances in the interpretation of the proto- and deutero-Pauline letters—for example on Rom 7:7-25 and 11:1-32, passages that have drawn a lot of ink in past decades. After the proto-Pauline letters, three chapters on the deutero-Paulines, their Christology, their ecclesiology and the mystèrion complete this volume, and over the course of their analyses, it will be possible to follow the evolution of recent exegesis. At the methodological level, Aletti has also contributed to advancing the research on Pauline rhetoric, which has been considerably enriched and diversified since H.D. Betz’s decisive article on the composition of the Letter to the Galatians in 1975. In reading the pages of this volume dedicated to Pauline rhetoric, the reader will perceive how the rhetorical approach has been beneficial, with the understanding that at the same time it is important not to fall into panrhetoric: the exegete cannot be satisfied with following only one approach, as useful as it may be. May the reader of the essays be convinced of the usefulness of exegesis for entering into the paradoxical beauty of Pauline thought. Theologians often reproach exegetes for being too focused on the literal meaning and for too closely scrutinizing verses. They forget that the sensus plenior is given for accurately understanding the literalmeaning that contemporary exegesis has shown has changed with developments in archeology, history, along with the discovery of a number of important ancient inscriptions and manuscripts. Well-placed and well-explained, the literal meaning opens its riches to those who make the effort of becoming better acquainted with it.  
In this volume the reader will find the articles that constituted important advances in the interpretation of the proto- and deutero-Pauline letters—for example on Rom 7:7-25 and 11:1-32, passages that have drawn a lot of ink in past decades. After the proto-Pauline letters, three chapters on the deutero-Paulines, their Christology, their ecclesiology and the mystèrion complete this volume, and over the course of their analyses, it will be possible to follow the evolution of recent exegesis. At the methodological level, Aletti has also contributed to advancing the research on Pauline rhetoric, which has been considerably enriched and diversified since H.D. Betz’s decisive article on the composition of the Letter to the Galatians in 1975. In reading the pages of this volume dedicated to Pauline rhetoric, the reader will perceive how the rhetorical approach has been beneficial, with the understanding that at the same time it is important not to fall into panrhetoric: the exegete cannot be satisfied with following only one approach, as useful as it may be. May the reader of the essays be convinced of the usefulness of exegesis for entering into the paradoxical beauty of Pauline thought. Theologians often reproach exegetes for being too focused on the literal meaning and for too closely scrutinizing verses. They forget that the sensus plenior is given for accurately understanding the literalmeaning that contemporary exegesis has shown has changed with developments in archeology, history, along with the discovery of a number of important ancient inscriptions and manuscripts. Well-placed and well-explained, the literal meaning opens its riches to those who make the effort of becoming better acquainted with it.  
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