The Intercultural City: Planning for Diversity Advantage

Routledge
Free sample

In a world of increasing mobility, how people of different cultures live together is a key issue of our age, especially for those responsible for planning and running cities. New thinking is needed on how diverse communities can cooperate in productive harmony instead of leading parallel or antagonistic lives. Policy is often dominated by mitigating the perceived negative effects of diversity, and little thought is given to how adiversity dividend or increased innovative capacity might be achieved. The Intercultural City, based on numerous case studies worldwide, analyses the links between urban change and cultural diversity. It draws on original research in the US, Europe, Australasia and the UK. It critiques past and current policy and introduces new conceptual frameworks. It provides significant and practical advice for readers, with new insights and tools for practitioners such as theintercultural lensindicators of opennessurban cultural literacy andten steps to an Intercultural City. Published with Comedia.
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About the author

Phil Wood has been a partner in the urban policy think-tank Comedia since 2000. He worked for 20 years in local government, community and cultural development and has advised the UK Government‘s Commission on Integration and Cohesion. Charles Landry founded Comedia in 1978, which seeks to rethink the major global issues for cities. An international authority on urban futures and city revitalization, he is the author of The Creative City and The Art of City-Making.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
May 16, 2012
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Pages
384
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ISBN
9781136553493
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Language
English
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Genres
Architecture / Landscape
Architecture / Urban & Land Use Planning
Political Science / Public Policy / Regional Planning
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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This text is about the very essence of urban planning in a market economy. It is concerned with people - landowners, developers, investors, politicians and ordinary members of the public - who produce change in towns and cities as they relate to each other and react to development Pressure. Whether Such Change Occurs Slowly And Is Almost Unnoticed, Or happens rapidly and is highly disruptive, a production process is creating a finished product: the built environment. This form of production, known as the land and property development process, is regulated but not controlled by the state. Urban planning is therefore best considered as one form of state intervention in the development process.; Since urban planning would have no legitimate basis without state power, it is an inherently political activity, able to alter the distribution of scarce environmental resources. Through doing so, it seeks to resolve conflicts of interest over the use and development of land. However, urban plans that appear to favour particular interests such as house-builders above others such as community groups provoke intense controversy. Development planning can thus become highly politicized, with alliances and divisions between politicians not always explained by traditional party politics.; These issues are explored with particular reference to statutory plan-making at the local level. The author draws on his extensive research into urban planning and development, making use of recent case studies and examples to illustrate key points. There are four parts. The first explores the operation of land and property markets and development processes, and examines how the state intervenes in the form of urban planning. The second part looks at the people and organizations who play a critical role in shaping the built environment and considers their relationship with the planning system. Specific attention is paid to important actors in the development process, such as landowners, developers, financial institutions, professional advisers and to the variety of agencies in the public sector that aim to promote development. This concludes with discussion of public- private partnerships and growth coalitions. The third part of the book concentrates on local development planning.
Principles of Horticulture is an excellent introduction to the study of all aspects of the subject. Written in an accessible and readable style it explains the principles that underlie the cultivation of flowers, fruits, vegetables, turf, ornamental planting in outdoors and in protected culture; commercially as well as in the garden and on the allotment. Readers ranging from first time students at the beginning of their careers in horticulture through to seasoned gardeners with many years of practical experience will find it essential reading.

This fifth edition has been restructured to bring it in to line with the most recent RHS syllabus, adding new material on the basis of science for horticulturists. The book contains beginning of chapter summaries, highlighted definitions and key points, and end of chapter test your learning questions. Each chapter ends with references for further reading.

Structured to meet the needs of a wide variety of courses in horticulture at levels 2 and 3, this book is particularly suitable for the RHS Certificate, Advanced Certificate and Diploma in Horticulture, BTEC National and the City and Guilds/NPTC National and Advanced National Certificate and Diploma courses. It also supports those studying plant science and related modules for 'A' Level Biology and the Diploma in Environmental and Land-based studies.

Charles Adams BSc (Agric) Hons, Dip Applied Educ., Fellow Inst Horticulture, is a lecturer at Capel Manor College and University of Hertfordshire, an external examiner in horticulture, and also a member of the Royal Horticultural Society Qualifications Advisory Committee.

Katherine Bamford BSc (Agric Sci) Hons, Cert Ed., formerly lecturer in horticulture science at Oaklands College, St. Albans, works in the commercial sector with herbs, organic vegetables and hardy plants.

Mike Early MSc, BSc Hons, DTA, Cert Ed., formerly a lecturer in horticulture science at Oaklands College, St. Albans, now works as a landscape gardner.
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