Living on Fire: The Life of L. Brent Bozell Jr.

Open Road Media
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“A triumph . . . A moving, beautifully written biography.” —National Review


From the beginning, L. Brent Bozell seemed destined for great things.
 
An extraordinary orator, the young man with fiery red hair won a national debate competition in high school and later was elected president of Yale’s storied Political Union, where his debating partner was his close friend William F. Buckley Jr. In less than a decade after graduating from Yale, Bozell helped Buckley launch National Review, became a popular columnist and speaker, and, most famously, wrote Barry Goldwater’s landmark book The Conscience of a Conservative.
 
But after setting his sights on high political office, Bozell took a different route in the 1960s. He abruptly moved his family to Spain; he founded a traditional Catholic magazine, Triumph, that quickly turned radical; he repudiated on religious grounds the U.S. Constitution; he made it his mission to transform America into a Catholic nation; he led the nation’s first major antiabortion protest (featuring a militant group known as the Sons of Thunder); he severed ties with his erstwhile friends from the conservative movement, including Buckley (who was also his brother-in-law). By the mid-1970s, Bozell had fallen prey to bipolar disorder and alcoholism, leading life as if “manacled to a roller coaster.”
 
Biographer Daniel Kelly tells Bozell’s remarkable story vividly and with sensitivity in Living on Fire. To write this book, Kelly interviewed dozens of friends and family members and gained unprecedented access to Bozell’s private correspondence. The result is a richly textured portrait of a gifted, complex man—his triumphs as well as his struggles.
 

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About the author

Daniel Kelly (1938–2012) was the author of James Burnham and the Struggle for the World, a life of L. Brent Bozell’s National Review colleague. He taught history at New York University’s Washington Square College and the City University of New York’s York College.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Open Road Media
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Published on
Mar 25, 2014
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Pages
272
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ISBN
9781497635487
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Language
English
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Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Political
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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