Reaching a Multicultural Student Community: A Handbook for Academic Librarians

Libraries Unlimited
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Changing student demographics demand that colleges and universities meet the special needs of a new population, and libraries will play an increasingly important role in facing these challenges of the future. This professional reference is intended for academic librarians interested in establishing peer outreach programs for minority students. The volume includes an overview of the unique challenges facing academic institutions and libraries today in serving a diverse student population, suggestions on working effectively in the current academic environment, and practical guidelines for specific program design, implementation, and evaluation. Topics considered include performing a community analysis, the politics of program development, budgeting, personnel management, and program evaluation. Model program materials are included to assist librarians in establishing similar programs, and a bibliography provides a list of additional information sources.
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About the author

KAREN E. DOWNING is Associate Librarian and Coordinator of Academic Outreach Services at the University of Michigan Undergraduate Library.

BARBARA MacADAM is Head of the Undergraduate Library at the Univerity of Michigan. She has published in journals such as College and Research Libraries, The Reference Librarian, and the Journal of Academic Librarianship.

DARLENE P. NICHOLS is Associate Librarian at the Univerity of Michigan Undergraduate Library. Her publications include articles on Peer Information Counseling in the Journal of Academic Librarianship.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Libraries Unlimited
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Published on
Dec 31, 1993
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Pages
223
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ISBN
9780313279126
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Multicultural Education
Language Arts & Disciplines / Library & Information Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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