Globalization's Limits: Conflicting National Interests in Trade and Finance

Gower Publishing, Ltd.
Free sample

So far there has been only praise for globalization. However, the export wave of China’s manufacturing machine and, more recently, the Global financial crisis show that globalization has limits.

Globalization, the internationalization of trade, and financial integration are having enormous implications for businesses as well as for the whole economies of countries or blocks of countries. In this book Dr Chorafas argues that research is now producing evidence that there are limits to such globalization and amalgamation and that these need to be better defined and understood if some of the problems now being identified are to be prevented from applying the brakes, or worse, putting the process into reverse gear.

The author examines the impact on countries such as the United States and European Union of occurrences like China's emergence as a massive manufacturing platform and the distortions of trade that result, affecting countries' GDP and creating problems such as uncontrollable current account deficits. He also considers the effect of Sovereign Wealth Funds as new entrants on the scene. These, he argues, are seen by some as 'the Trojan horses of state capitalism', particularly in what he defines as the 'absence of a global sheriff'.

Globalization’s Limits looks at the EU and the Euroland as a test of globalization. The conclusions Chorafas draws about the effect on member states of pan-European banking, and the Euro as common currency, have implications for Britain and for the rest of the world. Issues relating to missed opportunities and leadership beg questions such as 'Who, if anybody, is or should be in charge of global monetary policy?

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About the author

Professor Dr Dimitris Chorafas is an academic and consultant. He is a member of the New York Academy of Sciences and the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL). Dr Chorafas is a n engineering graduate of the National Technical University of Athens and of UCLA. He undertook postgraduate studies in finance and he is a Doctor of Science (in maths and logic from the Sorbonne). He has been a Fulbright Scholar and has taught in universities around the world.
During his career, Dr Chorafas has been a consultant to the board of UBS, Bank of Scotland, Commerzbank, Istituto Bancario Italiano, Italcementi, AEG, Telefunken, GE Bull, and Nestle. Over 8,000 executives around the world have attended his seminar programme. In 1992, in conjunction with the Swiss Academies of Sciences, he established his Foundation which grants awards to PhD students at 25 universities worldwide. Dr. Chorafas has authored 150 books.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Gower Publishing, Ltd.
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Published on
Aug 28, 2012
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Pages
354
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ISBN
9781409459750
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Management
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Since the financial crisis of 2008, many of us have had to reexamine our beliefs about markets and globalization. How integrated should economies really be? How much regulation is right?

Many people fuse these two dimensions of choice into one, either favoring both globalization and deregulation—or opposing both of them.

It doesn’t have to be that way.

In World 3.0, award-winning author and economist Pankaj Ghemawat reveals the folly in both of these responses. He calls for a third worldview—one in which both regulation and cross-border integration coexist and complement one another.

Ghemawat starts by exposing common assumptions about globalization to hard data, proving that the world is not nearly as globalized as we think. And he explains why the potential gains from further integration are much larger than even pro globalizers tend to believe.

He then tackles market failures and fears—job losses, environmental degradation, macroeconomic volatility, and trade and capital imbalances—that opponents of globalization often invoke. Drawing on compelling data, he shows that increased globalization can actually alleviate some of these problems.

Finally, Ghemawat describes how a wide range of players—businesses, policy makers, citizens, media—can help open up flows of ideas, people, and goods across borders, but in ways that maximize the benefits and minimize the potential side effects.

World 3.0 dispels powerfully entrenched—but incorrect—assumptions about globalization. Provocative and bold, this new book explains how people around the world can secure their collective prosperity through new approaches to cross-border integration. Ghemawat’s thinking will surprise and move you—no matter where you stand on globalization.
Can the free market system continue to operate in a traditional way in a world that is now globally connected, financially dysfunctional, and becoming environmentally damaged by excessive consumption? Can an alternative approach that respects human culture and values at least as much as it does profit be readily identified? In this rigorous critique, the author, who is a former member of a World Bank mission and adviser to the Turkish Prime Minister, suggests that the answer to both questions is 'No'. Emphasizing the distinction between wealth and welfare, Ozer Ertuna recognises that the search for a helpful way forward based on classical economic concepts, models and arguments is likely to prove fruitless. In this challenging book you are invited to consider that different approaches are needed. Using a mixture of theory and practical examples, Professor Ertuna examines markets and international trade in the era of globalization from scientific, economic, cultural, philosophical and faith-based viewpoints. He explains how what he describes as 'The Science of the 21st Century' may be part of any new emergent order. His survey of the different perspectives details what is being proposed by the 'Post Autistic Economics' movement; the Nobel laureates of the Santa Fe Institute; 'critical theoreticians'; environmentalists; and others. Vedic philosophy, other belief systems, and the significance of Anatolian culture may not be part of the usual discourse for business leaders, but as the role of business in society becomes ever more critical, an understanding of the range of perspectives brought to us by this book becomes increasingly essential. Those with an academic interest in the issues addressed here, as well as business and community leaders, policy makers, and those in government and non-governmental organizations will want to read this valuable addition to Gower's highly respected Corporate Social Responsibility Series.
The Challenge
Built to Last, the defining management study of the nineties, showed how great companies triumph over time and how long-term sustained performance can be engineered into the DNA of an enterprise from the verybeginning.

But what about the company that is not born with great DNA? How can good companies, mediocre companies, even bad companies achieve enduring greatness?

The Study
For years, this question preyed on the mind of Jim Collins. Are there companies that defy gravity and convert long-term mediocrity or worse into long-term superiority? And if so, what are the universal distinguishing characteristics that cause a company to go from good to great?

The Standards
Using tough benchmarks, Collins and his research team identified a set of elite companies that made the leap to great results and sustained those results for at least fifteen years. How great? After the leap, the good-to-great companies generated cumulative stock returns that beat the general stock market by an average of seven times in fifteen years, better than twice the results delivered by a composite index of the world's greatest companies, including Coca-Cola, Intel, General Electric, and Merck.

The Comparisons
The research team contrasted the good-to-great companies with a carefully selected set of comparison companies that failed to make the leap from good to great. What was different? Why did one set of companies become truly great performers while the other set remained only good?

Over five years, the team analyzed the histories of all twenty-eight companies in the study. After sifting through mountains of data and thousands of pages of interviews, Collins and his crew discovered the key determinants of greatness -- why some companies make the leap and others don't.

The Findings
The findings of the Good to Great study will surprise many readers and shed light on virtually every area of management strategy and practice. The findings include:

Level 5 Leaders: The research team was shocked to discover the type of leadership required to achieve greatness. The Hedgehog Concept (Simplicity within the Three Circles): To go from good to great requires transcending the curse of competence. A Culture of Discipline: When you combine a culture of discipline with an ethic of entrepreneurship, you get the magical alchemy of great results. Technology Accelerators: Good-to-great companies think differently about the role of technology. The Flywheel and the Doom Loop: Those who launch radical change programs and wrenching restructurings will almost certainly fail to make the leap.

“Some of the key concepts discerned in the study,” comments Jim Collins, "fly in the face of our modern business culture and will, quite frankly, upset some people.”

Perhaps, but who can afford to ignore these findings?

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