Koreans in Central California (1903-1957): A Study of Settlement and Transnational Politics

University Press of America
Free sample

The Korean Kingdom and the United States signed a Treaty of Amity and Commerce in 1882. This treaty opened Korea to American missionaries who proselytized Christianity to the Koreans. When Hawaii sugar planters recruited Koreans to come to Hawaii to work in the Hawaii sugar plantations, they picked most of the Korean Hawaii emigrants from the Korean Christian converts. Between 1902 and 1905, some 7,000 of them immigrated to Hawaii. Of those 7,000, about 2,000 transmigrated to the mainland. Most of these Hawaii Korean trans-migrants settled on the West Coast, primarily in California. This book tells the Korean immigrants' life stories in California's eight San Joaquin Valley farm communities: Fresno, Hanford, Visalia, Dinuba, Reedley, Delano, Willows, and Maxwell. It describes how they survived through discrimination and injustices in early twentieth-century America, and also details the Korean immigrants' efforts to regain their lost motherland from Japanese colonialism (1910-1945).
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About the author

Marn J. Cha, Ph.D is a professor of political science at California State University, Fresno, California, where he has taught for forty-one years. He is a recipient of the Global Korea Award (2009) for his historical preservation effort. His research interests include immigration and transnational politics, non-governmental organizations' policy role, and how privatization of government functions transforms the modern states. He is currently president of Central California Korean Historical Society.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University Press of America
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Published on
Oct 11, 2010
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Pages
280
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ISBN
9780761852216
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Civics & Citizenship
Political Science / General
Political Science / Law Enforcement
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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