Access 2007 For Dummies

John Wiley & Sons
1

Reduce stress with timesaving database shortcuts

Explore database basics and build tables and reports that corral your data

Access has undergone an extreme makeover! Whether you've used one of the older versions or this is your first exposure to Access, here's where you'll find the essentials you need to make this database system work for you. Cruise around the new interface, team up Access with other Office applications, use wizards to automate your work, and much more.

Discover how to

  • Create a new Access database
  • Import and export data
  • Build forms for efficient data entry
  • Search tables for specific data
  • Construct custom reports
  • Customize your database navigation
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About the author

Laurie Ulrich Fuller has been writing about and teaching people to use Microsoft Office since the 1980’s. Her teaching career goes back to the time before Microsoft Windows – which means she also remembers the first time she taught people to use a Windows-based application, and a student picked up the mouse and aimed it at the computer screen as though using a TV remote. Nobody laughed (except Laurie, after class), because everyone was new to the mouse back then. As new as the mouse was, so was the idea of keeping a database on a computer that could fit on your desk — and Laurie’s been there through every new version of Access — as Office has evolved to meet the needs of users from all walks of life — from individuals to huge corporations, from growing business to non-profit organizations.
Since those early days of Office and Windows, Laurie has personally trained more than 10,000 people to make better, more creative use of their computers, has written and co-written more than 25 nationally-published books on computers and software — including several titles on Microsoft Office. In the last few years, she’s also created two video training courses — one on Word 2003, and the other on the entire Office 2003 suite. She runs her own company, Limehat & Company, offering training, educational materials, and web development services. She invites you to contact her at laurie@limehat.com, and to visit her personal website, www.planetlaurie.com, for more information.
Laurie would also like you to know that despite being able to remember the world before Windows, she does not remember a time before cars, television, or fire.

Ken Cook has built and managed a successful computer consulting business since 1990 serving clients in New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and California. He began as a trainer - training numerous users (too many to count!) on a variety of software packages — specializing in Microsoft Office.
Currently, he “dabbles in training” but his main focus is creating expert Microsoft Office solutions and Microsoft Access database solutions for Fortune 500 and small business clients.
He can be contacted through his Web site www.kcookpcbiz.com or email: ken@kcookpcbiz.com.

John Kaufeld is a popular For Dummies author.

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Additional Information

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons
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Published on
Feb 9, 2011
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Pages
432
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ISBN
9781118050880
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Features
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Language
English
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Genres
Computers / Desktop Applications / Databases
Computers / Software Development & Engineering / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Laurie Ulrich Fuller
Your all-access guide to all things Access 2016

If you don't know a relational database from an isolationist table—but still need to figure out how to organize and analyze your data—Access 2016 For Dummies is for you. Written in a friendly and accessible manner, it assumes no prior Access or database-building knowledge and walks you through the basics of creating tables to store your data, building forms that ease data entry, writing queries that pull real information from your data, and creating reports that back up your analysis. Add in a dash of humor and fun, and Access 2016 For Dummies is the only resource you'll need to go from data rookie to data pro!

This expanded and updated edition of Access For Dummies covers all of the latest information and features to help data newcomers better understand Access' role in the world of data analysis and data science. Inside, you'll get a crash course on how databases work—and how to build one from the ground up. Plus, you'll find step-by-step guidance on how to structure data to make it useful, manipulate, edit, and import data into your database, write and execute queries to gain insight from your data, and report data in elegant ways. Speak the lingo of database builders and create databases that suit your needs Organize your data into tables and build forms that ease data entry Query your data to get answers right Create reports that tell the story of your data findings

If you have little to no experience with creating and managing a database of any sort, Access 2016 For Dummies is the perfect starting point for learning the basics of building databases, simplifying data entry and reporting, and improving your overall data skills.

John Kaufeld
When you hear the word “database,” do your eyes glaze over? Does the mention of fields and tables make your blood pressure skyrocket? Does the idea of entering and using hyperlinks make you hyperventilate?

Whether you’re running a business or a household . . . whether you need to be able to quickly access customer information, your recipe for chicken cacciatore, or the Little League team’s records, Access 2003 holds the key. This friendly guide unlocks the secrets of using Access 2003 to store, manage, organize, reorganize, and use data! It gives you:

The basics of the whole database concept Suggestions for solving problems with Access What you need to know to design, build, use, and change Access tables Info on the ten most common types of fields The scoop on using queries to unearth the answers hiding somewhere in your data Guidelines for using the Access report system to make short work of long, previously time-consuming, reports

In the relaxed, comfortable For Dummies style, this book has easy-to-follow, step-by-step instructions and lots of screen shots. If you want to create and manage a database for a huge auction house, this guide will get you going . . . going . . .  gone. If you want to create a database for your music collection, it gives you the score then shows you how to use formatting and add graphics to jazz it up. You’ll get the low-down on extracting all kinds of information from databases and putting that information to practical use. You’ll discover how to:

Use Label Wizard to create mailing labels, file labels, shipping labels, or name tags Use Chart Wizard to create line charts, bar, cone, and column charts, pie and donut charts, area charts, and XY and bubble charts Use Auto Reports to create columnar or tabular reports and then fine-tune them Export reports to Microsoft Word and Excel Get your data Web-ready and put it on the Internet in either static or dynamic form Build forms with Form Wizard

And speaking of high-tech fun, Access 2003 For Dummies even tells you how to install and use speech recognition software with Access 2003. So if the idea of working with databases has you talking to yourself, this is just the book you need.

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