Concerning the Spiritual in Art

The Floating Press
1
Free sample

Kandinsky sees the spiritual life of humanity as a pyramid. The artist must lead the layman to the top of this pyramid through the soulful exercise of art. Kandinsky differentiates between the superficial pleasure art inspires and the inner resonance created when art is considered attentively and allowed to touch the soul. The artist is allowed absolute freedom in order to express their soul's art, but they must not abuse this freedom if they are not expressing a personal inner resonance. Once the artwork is complete, the mystic quality they have poured into it become independent of them and filled with a spiritual breath.
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About the author

Wassily Kandinsky was born in 1866 and is one of the most famous artists of the 20th century.

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Additional Information

Publisher
The Floating Press
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Published on
Jan 1, 2009
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Pages
135
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ISBN
9781775411543
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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The science of aesthetics was originally based on classical art even a contemporary philosopher of art like Croce never departs from the data of the Graeco-Roman and Renaissance tradition. Modern art, however, has made a decisive break with that tradition, and considerable confusion has been caused by the application to its products of criteria of judgment derived from a past historical phase. Even in our private, unprofessional approach to modern art, we come unconsciously armed with such prejudices. What, therefore, was necessary was a complete revision of aesthetics on the basis of the ample material produced by the modern movement in art, and this Mr. Allen Leepa has now provided. The material in question consists primarily of the works' of art themselves, and these, in significant selection, Mr. Leepa has subjected to a thorough functional analysis. But he realises that the explanation of art does not end with its formal dissection the function of art, as he says, is to ex press emotional meanings in the organized patterns of a medium and he has ventured on the much more difficult task of defining the nature of that psychological process. At this point formal analysis is of no avail, and what we fall back on is the artist's own description of his activity. Luckily modern artists have been surprisingly communicative, and Mr. Leepa has not failed to take advantage of the statements which, from time to time, artists like Picasso, Matisse, Klee and Mondrian have made. He has been aided in his under standing of what they mean ( which is not always clear) by his own practice as a painter, which has saved him from some of the simplifications which an outsider might be tempted to make for the sake of a neat system. Admirable, for example, is the way in which he insists, in Chapter X, on the mutual interaction of medium and idea in the process of creation. We are far too apt to think of the work of art as the illustration of a preconceived idea, instead of an organic growth in which idea only played the part of germ or seed. Particular attention should be given to all that Mr. Leepa has to say on the subject of abstract art, for which the average critic has hitherto reserved his most obstinate resistance. In its various forms ( and there is a wide divergence of aim within the so-called abstract movement) this type of art does, of course, make the most decisive break with the classical or humanist tradition. It is to be observed, however, that it is precisely this type of art which lends itself to the formulation of a coherent aesthetic; and though Mr. Leepa quite rightly insists on its individualistic and subjective nature, the final result would seem to be the discovery of archetypal forms of the widest social significance. The last point I would like to select for emphasis from a book so replete with interest is the firm way in which Mr. Leepa insists on the social significance of his subject.
Wassily Kandinsky was an influential Russian painter and art theorist, now celebrated as one of the pioneers of pure abstraction in modern painting. Delphi’s Masters of Art Series presents the world’s first digital e-Art books, allowing digital readers to explore the works of the world’s greatest artists in comprehensive detail. This volume presents Kandinsky’s pre-1923 works in beautiful detail, with concise introductions, hundreds of high quality images and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)

* A comprehensive range of Kandinsky’s works — over 200 paintings, fully indexed and arranged in chronological and alphabetical order
* Includes reproductions of rare works
* Features a special ‘Highlights’ section, with concise introductions to the masterpieces, giving valuable contextual information
* Enlarged ‘Detail’ images, allowing you to explore Kandinsky’s celebrated works in detail, as featured in traditional art books
* Hundreds of images in stunning colour – highly recommended for viewing on tablets and smart phones or as a valuable reference tool on more conventional eReaders
* Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the paintings
* Easily locate the paintings you want to view
* Includes Kandinsky's celebrated treatise CONCERNING THE SPIRITUAL IN ART
* Scholarly ordering of plates into chronological order

Please note: to comply with US copyright law, this US edition of the eBook does not include Kandinsky’s painting produced after 1922.  When new works enter the public domain, they will be added to the eBook as a free update.

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting e-Art books

CONTENTS:

The Highlights
ODESSA PORT
PORTRAIT OF GABRIELE MÜNTER
THE BLUE RIDER
COUPLE RIDING
CEMETERY AND VICARAGE IN KOCHEL
MURNAU-VIEW WITH RAILWAY AND CASTLE
PICTURE WITH ARCHER
LYRICAL
IMPROVISATION 26
SMALL PLEASURES
BLACK STROKES I
MOSCOW I
RED OVAL
STOREYS
COMPOSITION VII

The Paintings
CHRONOLOGICAL LIST OF PAINTINGS
ALPHABETICAL LIST OF PAINTINGS

The Treatise
CONCERNING THE SPIRITUAL IN ART

Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles
"I had the impression that here painting itself comes to the foreground; I wondered if it would not be possible to go further in this direction."
Thus did the young Russian painter Wassily Kandinsky (1866–1944) react to his first viewing of Monet's Haystack, included in an 1895 Moscow exhibit of French Impressionists. It was his first perception of the dematerialization of an object and presaged the later development of his influential theories of non-objective art.
During study and travel in Europe, the young artist breathed the heady atmosphere of artistic experimentation. Fauvism, Cubism, Symbolism, and other movements played an important role in the development of his own revolutionary approach to painting. Decrying literal representation, Kandinsky emphasized instead the importance of form, color, rhythm, and the artist's inner need in expressing reality.
In Point and Line to Plane, one of the most influential books in 20th-century art, Kandinsky presents a detailed exposition of the inner dynamics of non-objective painting. Relying on his own unique terminology, he develops the idea of point as the "proto-element" of painting, the role of point in nature, music, and other art, and the combination of point and line that results in a unique visual language. He then turns to an absorbing discussion of line — the influence of force on line, lyric and dramatic qualities, and the translation of various phenomena into forms of linear expression. With profound artistic insight, Kandinsky points out the organic relationship of the elements of painting, touching on the role of texture, the element of time, and the relationship of all these elements to the basic material plane called upon to receive the content of a work of art.
Originally published in 1926, this essay represents the mature flowering of ideas first expressed in Kandinsky's earlier seminal book, Concerning the Spiritual in Art. As an influential member of the Bauhaus school and a leading theoretician of abstract expressionism, Kandinsky helped formulate the modern artistic temperament. This book amply demonstrates the importance of his contribution and its profound effect on 20th-century art.
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