Vaccines: The Biggest Medical Fraud in History

History of Vaccination

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"Polio is NOT even contagious or infectious (never proven to be). There is NO proof Polio is caused by a virus. There is NO evidence that anyone caught polio from another person in the family. There is NO evidence that any nurse or doctor caught polio from a patient." —Sheri Nakken, RN, MA


Listed below are public health statistics (U.S. Public Health Reports) from the four states which adopted compulsory vaccination, and the figures from Los Angeles, California (similar results in other states available from books listed at the back of this booklet): 


TENNESSEE

1958: 119 cases of polio before compulsory shots 

1959: 386 cases of polio after compulsory shots 


OHIO


1958: 17 cases of polio before compulsory shots 

1959: 52 cases of polio after compulsory shots 


CONNECTICUT


1958: 45 cases of polio before compulsory shots 

1959: 123 cases of polio after compulsory shots 


NORTH CAROLINA


1958: 78 cases of polio before compulsory shots 

1959: 313 cases of polio after compulsory shots 


LOS ANGELES


1958: 89 cases of polio before shots 

1959: 190 cases of polio after shots 


The decline of smallpox, as with many other infectious diseases, including diphtheria and scarlet fever, coincided with the sanitation reforms which were instituted in the late 1880s. Where obtainable, government health records from around the world showed that during the periods of the most intense and widespread vaccination, the incidence of and death rates from smallpox were highest. For instance, in Kansas City and Pittsburgh during the 1920s, lawsuits were initiated, and won, against doctors and medical societies for declaring smallpox epidemics when there were none, and for creating epidemics with their vaccination drives. 


Before 1903, smallpox was almost unknown in the Philippines, with occurrences in less than 3% of the population, and that in a mild form. The U.S. military went in and began vaccinating, and by 1905 the Philippines had its first major epidemic. Vaccination was made compulsory in 1910. From 1905 to 1923, the mortality rate ranged from 25-75%, depending on the count from the various islands. “The mortality rate was the highest in the cities where vaccination was most intense.” Dr. W.W. Keen reported 130,264 cases and 74,369 deaths from smallpox in 1921. 


Japan adopted compulsory vaccinations in 1872 when they had only a few cases of smallpox. By 1892 they had the largest smallpox epidemic in their history with 165,774 cases and 29,979 deaths. 

Australia banned the smallpox vaccine after some children were killed by it, and in the following 15 years in unvaccinated Australia there were only 3 cases of smallpox. 

The smallpox vaccine was discontinued in the United States after Dr. Henry Kempe reported to Congress in 1966 that fewer people were dying from the disease than from vaccination. 

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Additional Information

Publisher
EnCognitive.com
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Published on
Jan 28, 2018
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Pages
437
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ISBN
9781927091579
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Language
English
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Content protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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