The Republic of Color: Science, Perception, and the Making of Modern America

University of Chicago Press
Free sample

The Republic of Color delves deep into the history of color science in the United States to unearth its origins and examine the scope of its influence on the industrial transformation of turn-of-the-century America.

For a nation in the grip of profound economic, cultural, and demographic crises, the standardization of color became a means of social reform—a way of sculpting the American population into one more amenable to the needs of the emerging industrial order. Delineating color was also a way to characterize the vagaries of human nature, and to create ideal structures through which those humans would act in a newly modern American republic. Michael Rossi’s compelling history goes far beyond the culture of the visual to show readers how the control and regulation of color shaped the social contours of modern America—and redefined the way we see the world.
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About the author

Michael Rossi is assistant professor of the history of science and medicine at the University of Chicago.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Aug 30, 2019
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Pages
320
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ISBN
9780226651866
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Language
English
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Genres
History / United States / 20th Century
Psychology / General
Psychology / Industrial & Organizational Psychology
Science / General
Science / History
Technology & Engineering / History
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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If you've read books such as The Third Industrial Revolution, They Made America, or How We Got to Now, you're going to love New Thinking

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