Fish Physiology: Zebrafish

Fish Physiology

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This cutting-edge resource includes up-to-date information on zebrafish physiology and the tools used to study it, not only as a model species for studies of other vertebrates but with application for studies of human disease and aquatic toxicology. The utility of zebrafish for physiological research is based on several key features including i) a "fully" sequenced genome, ii) rapid (~3 month) generation times), iii) their capacity to produce large numbers of externally fertilized eggs, iv) optical transparency of embryos and larvae, and v) the applicability of reverse and forward genetics to assess gene function. Gene knockdown in embryos and the production of transgenic strains are now standard techniques being used to assess physiology. This book will be of keen interest not only to the typical readers of Fish Physiology but also to biomedical researchers, toxicologists and developmental biologists.
  • Integrates and synthesizes the biology of the zebrafish under one cover
  • Features contributions from the leading researchers in their fields
  • Reaches a wider audience of researchers and biologists with its broad inclusion of subjects relating to zebrafish physiology
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About the author

Tony Farrell is a graduate of Bath University, where he was fortunate to study with Peter Lutz. His fortunes grew further when he moved in 1974 to Canada and the Zoology Department at the University of British Columbia to complete his Ph.D. degree under the superb tutelage of Dave Randall. In 2004, Tony returned to UBC when he accepted an endowed research chair in Sustainable Aquaculture.

In between these positions at UBC, Tony was employed at the University of Southern California (PDF), the University of New Brunswick (sessional lecturer), Mount Allison University (first real job) and Simon Fraser University (moving through the ranks to a full professor). In addition to highly controlled laboratory experiments on fish cardiorespiratory physiology, Tony is committed to working on animals in their own environment. Therefore, his research on fish physiology has taken him on an Alpha Helix expedition to the Amazon, the University of Gothenburg and the Kristineberg Marine Research Station in Sweden, the Portobello Marine Biological Station in New Zealand, the University of Christchurch and Massey University in New Zealand, the Bamfield Marine Science Station and the Huntsman Marine Station in Canada, the University of Aarhus in Denmark, the University of Adelaide Charles and Darwin University in Australia, and to the Danish Arctic Marine Station on Disco Island in Greenland. These travels have allowed him to work and with many superb collaborators word-wide, as well as study the physiology of over 70 different species of fish. Tony has received a number of awards for his scientific contributions: an honorary degree from the University of Gothenburg in Sweden; Awards of Excellence from the American Fisheries Society for Fish Physiology, Conservation and Management; the Fry Medal from the Canadian Society of Zoologists; and the Beverton Medal from the Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

The primary goal of his research program is to investigate environmental adaptations (both mechanistic and evolutionary) in relation to gas-exchange, acid-base balance and ion regulation in fish, integrating responses from the molecular, cellular and organismal level. The ultimate goal is to understand how evolutionary pressures have shaped physiological systems among vertebrates and to determine the degree to which physiological systems can adapt/acclimate to natural and anthropogenic environmental changes. This information is crucial for basic biology and understanding the diversity of biological systems, but much of his research conducted to date can also be applied to issues of aquaculture, toxicology and water quality criteria development, as well as fisheries management.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Academic Press
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Published on
Jun 23, 2010
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Pages
468
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ISBN
9780080961378
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Anatomy & Physiology
Science / Life Sciences / Developmental Biology
Science / Life Sciences / Genetics & Genomics
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / General
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / Ichthyology & Herpetology
Technology & Engineering / Fisheries & Aquaculture
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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The need for ion and water homeostasis is common to all life. For fish, ion and water homeostasis is an especially important challenge because they live in direct contact with water and because of the large variation in the salt content of natural waters (varying by over 5 orders of magnitude). Most fish are stenohaline and are unable to move between freshwater and seawater. Remarkably, some fishes are capable of life in both freshwater and seawater. These euryhaline fishes constitute an estimated 3 to 5% of all fish species. Euryhaline fishes represent some of the most iconic and interesting of all fish species, from salmon and sturgeon that make epic migrations to intertidal mudskippers that contend with daily salinity changes. With the advent of global climate change and increasing sea levels, understanding the environmental physiology of euryhaline species is critical for environmental management and any mitigative measures. This volume will provide the first integrative review of euryhalinity in fish. There is no other book that focuses on fish that have the capacity to move between freshwater and seawater. The different challenges of salt and water balance in different habitats have led to different physiological controls and regulation, which heretofore has not been reviewed in a single volume. Collects and synthesizes the literature covering the state of knowledge of the physiology of euryhaline fish

Provides the foundational information needed for researchers from a variety of fields, including fish physiology, conservation and evolutionary biology, genomics, ecology, ecotoxicology, and comparative physiologyAll authors are the leading researchers and emerging leaders in their fields
Zebrafish are widely considered an excellent model system for vertebrate development. The embryo is transparent, thereby enabling visualization and use of labelling and transgenic approaches. Moreover, because of the ease of inducing new mutations in zebrafish and similarity with the human genome, this organism may be used effectively for disease studies. For example, mutant zebrafish are being utilized for testing drugs that will combat a range of human diseases, from Alzheimer's and cancer to kidney failure and congenital heart disease. For the first time, this atlas provides the research community with a complete reference for zebrafish anatomy spanning the early embryo all the way to adulthood.

The authors employ the technique of optical projection tomography (OPT), and offer a series of sections in multiple planes from each sample. The contents are organized by developmental stages, with over 200 images that contain annotations describing anatomical structures relevant to development. In addition, chapters feature explanatory text that highlights major developments in the zebrafish during each stage.

Provides the first comprehensive anatomical resource that covers all regions of zebrafish anatomy from the larval period to adulthoodThe over 200 images include explanatory notesEach chapter contains a concise description of key anatomical features that factor in zebrafish developmentDespite many years of use as a model system, until now there has never been a guide to zebrafish at the larval stageThe book's website contains a database of over 10k sections from different regions as well as 3D images that are interactive
Homeostasis and Toxicology of Essential Metals synthesizes the explosion of new information on the molecular, cellular, and organismal handling of metals in fish in the past 15 years. These elements are no longer viewed by fish physiologists as "heavy metals" that kill fish by suffocation, but rather as interesting moieties that enter and leave fish by specific pathways, which are subject to physiological regulation. The metals featured in this volume are those about which there has been most public and scientific concern, and therefore are those most widely studied by fish researchers. Metals such as Cu, Zn, Fe, Ni, Co, Se, Mo and Cr are either proven to be or are strongly suspected to be essential in trace amounts, yet are toxic in higher doses.

The companion volume, Homeostasis and Toxicology of Non-Essential Metals, Volume 31B, covers metals that have no known nutritive function in fish at present, but which are toxic at fairly low levels, such as Ag, Al, Cd, Pb, Hg, As, Sr, and U. In addition, three chapters in Volumes 31A and 31B on Basic Principles (Chapter 1, 31A), Field Studies and Ecological Integration (Chapter 9, 31A) and Modeling the Physiology and Toxicology of Metals (Chapter 9, 31B) act as integrative summaries and make these two volumes a vital set for readers.

All major essential metals of interest are covered in metal-specific chaptersEach metal-specific chapter is written by fish physiologists/toxicologists who are recognized authorities for that metalA common format is featured throughout this two volume edition
Like other books in the Laboratory Animal Pocket Reference Series, this guide covers all aspects pertaining to the use of these organisms including their basic biology, humane care and management, husbandry, life support systems, regulatory compliance, technical procedures, veterinary care, and water quality management.

In the relatively brief span of only a few decades, the zebrafish has gone from being mainly a hobby fish to a mainstream model animal employed by scientists to study everything from stem cells to the basis of behavioral changes induced by drug addiction. This rapid advance has been fueled largely by numerous and impressive advances in technology, along with detailed characterization of the animal on a genetic and molecular level. These developments have allowed scientists to leverage the many advantages of the zebrafish system to address many important questions in biology and human genetics and disease.

However, there are few accepted and established standards for husbandry, management, and care for the fish in laboratory settings and even fewer comprehensive and constantly reliable resources. To this end, the goal of this handbook is to provide managers, veterinarians, investigators, technicians, and regulatory personnel with a concise yet thorough reference on zebrafish biology, care, husbandry, and management.

The aim of the book is not to set standards, but rather to arm those working with the fish with scientifically grounded principles and fundamental information that can be used to design sound fish care programs. This handbook is organized into seven chapters:

Biology
Husbandry
Life Support Systems
Management
Veterinary Care
Experimental Methodology
Resources

The final chapter, Resources, provides the zebrafish user with lists of sources of additional information on the zebrafish model, as well as key references, professional organizations, and suppliers of equipment and supplies used in zebrafish husbandry and care.

The need for ion and water homeostasis is common to all life. For fish, ion and water homeostasis is an especially important challenge because they live in direct contact with water and because of the large variation in the salt content of natural waters (varying by over 5 orders of magnitude). Most fish are stenohaline and are unable to move between freshwater and seawater. Remarkably, some fishes are capable of life in both freshwater and seawater. These euryhaline fishes constitute an estimated 3 to 5% of all fish species. Euryhaline fishes represent some of the most iconic and interesting of all fish species, from salmon and sturgeon that make epic migrations to intertidal mudskippers that contend with daily salinity changes. With the advent of global climate change and increasing sea levels, understanding the environmental physiology of euryhaline species is critical for environmental management and any mitigative measures. This volume will provide the first integrative review of euryhalinity in fish. There is no other book that focuses on fish that have the capacity to move between freshwater and seawater. The different challenges of salt and water balance in different habitats have led to different physiological controls and regulation, which heretofore has not been reviewed in a single volume. Collects and synthesizes the literature covering the state of knowledge of the physiology of euryhaline fish

Provides the foundational information needed for researchers from a variety of fields, including fish physiology, conservation and evolutionary biology, genomics, ecology, ecotoxicology, and comparative physiologyAll authors are the leading researchers and emerging leaders in their fields
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