Regional Advantage: Culture and Competition in Silicon Valley and Route 128, With a New Preface by the Author

Harvard University Press
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Why is it that business in California's Silicon Valley flourished while along Route 128 in Massachusetts declined in the 90s? The answer, Saxenian suggests, has to do with the fact that despite similar histories and technologies, Silicon Valley developed a decentralized but cooperative industrial system while Route 128 came to be dominated by independent, self-sufficient corporations. The result of more than one hundred interviews, this compelling analysis highlights the importance of local sources of competitive advantage in a volatile world economy.
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Publisher
Harvard University Press
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Published on
Mar 1, 1996
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Pages
240
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ISBN
9780674735163
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economic History
Business & Economics / Urban & Regional
Computers / Information Technology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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