Women Struggling For a New Life: The Role of Religion in the Cultural Passage From Korea to America

SUNY Press
Free sample

Kim explores the religious impact, particularly that of the Korean Methodist Church, on the lives of Korean immigrant ilse (first generation) in the United States. To most of these women, America is new soil, and they need to adjust to a different cultural and social environment. Consequently, they may be confused and frustrated. As a community center, the Korean church plays a significant role in their lives. Kim examines the church, to determine if it is helpful or detrimental to these women as they adjust to their lives in the United States.

Although the history of Korean immigrants in the United States is almost 100 years old, resources about Korean immigrants, particularly women, are scarce. These women have long been invisible and unheard in American society as well as in the Korean community and church. Their experiences as minority women and their painful struggle for survival in patriarchal Korean churches reflect not only the plight of women but also genuine human struggle.
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About the author

Ai Ra Kim immigrated to the U.S. from Korea in 1962. She is pastor of Flanders United Methodist Church in New Jersey, former president of the United Methodist Asian American Clergywomen’s Association, and adjunct professor at New York Theological Seminary.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Pages
233
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ISBN
9781438409009
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Language
English
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Genres
Social Science / Women's Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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