Pilgrimage in Medieval England

A&C Black
1
Free sample

The men and women who gathered at the Tabard Inn in Southwark in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales are only the most famous of the tens of thousands of English pilgrims, from kings to peasants, who set off to the shrines of saints and the sites of miracles in the middle ages. As they traveled along well-established routes in the hope of a cure or a blessing, to fulfill a vow or to see new places, the pilgrims left records that let us see medieval people and their concerns and beliefs from a unique and intimate angle. As well as the most famous shrines, notably that of St Thomas Becket at Canterbury, Diana Webb also describes the many local pilgrimages and cults, and their rise and fall, over the English middle ages as a whole

"Webb's scholarly achievement deserves high praise" -Christina Hardyment, The Independent

Read more
Collapse

About the author


Diana Webb was Senior Lecturer in History at Kings College London until 2006. Her previous books include Patrons and Defenders: the Saints in the Italian City States (1996); Pilgrims and Pilgrimage in Medieval Europe (1999); Pilgrimage in Medieval England (2000); Medieval European Pilgrimage (2002); and Saints and Cities in Medieval Italy (2006).

Read more
Collapse
4.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
A&C Black
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Feb 10, 2007
Read more
Collapse
Pages
388
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9780826435699
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Best For
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
History / Europe / Medieval
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
For the first time, convincing locations have been found for all King Arthur’s battles.The inspiration for King Arthur’s Battle for Britain came from Eric’s discovery of an ancient Latin text in the British Library that listed the twelve battles of King Arthur. This presented an immediate challenge because only a few of the battle sites mentioned had been previously identified. After a decade searching mountains and moors throughout Britain, guided by references from early sources, Eric believes he has found convincing locations for all of Arthur’s battles.By developing an imaginary scenario for each battle in the chronological order of the text, a believable storyline has emerged depicting Arthur’s struggle to defend his country against nine different enemies, including dissident Britons as well as the invading Angles and Saxons. Eric has also discovered that it was Arthur’s own kith and kin who plotted his demise at the battle of Camlan. By linking clues interwoven with early poetry and legendary texts, Eric has been able to suggest the name of the Romano-British city most likely to have been King Arthur’s ‘Camelot’ and has also identified the site of Arthur’s military headquarters in the west. His search for new evidence confirms the location of Camlan and reveals the real Isle of Avalon, where Arthur was finally laid to rest.King Arthur’s Battle for Britain will appeal to anyone interested in the Arthurian period and the legend of King Arthur. Eric has been inspired by Geoffrey Ashe’s The Quest for Arthur’s Britain and John Morris’ The Age of Arthur.
Saints and their Communities offers a new approach to the study of lay religion as evidenced in collections of miracle narratives in twelfth-century England. There are a number of problems associated with the interpretation of this hagiographical genre and an extended introduction discusses these. The first issue is the tendency to read these narratives as transparent accounts of lay religion as if it were something susceptible to static, 'ethnographic' treatment in isolation from wider social and political activities. The second issue is the challenge of explaining the miraculous as a credible part of cultural experience, without appealing to reductionist notions of a 'medieval mindset'. The third issue is the problem of how to take full account of the fact that these sources are representations of lay experience by monastic authors. The author argues that miracle narratives were the product of and helped to foster lay notions of Christian practice and identity centred on the spiritual patronage of certain enshrined saints. The six main chapters provide fully contextualized studies of selected miracle collections. Yarrow looks at when these collections were made, who wrote them, the kinds of audiences they are likely to have reached, and the messages they were intended to convey. He shows how these texts served to represent specific cults in terms that articulated the values and interests of the institutions acting as custodians of the relics; and how alongside other programmes of textual production, these collections of stories can be linked to occasions of uncertainty or need in the life of these institutions. A concluding chapter argues the case for miracle collections as evidence of the attempt by traditional monasteries to reach out to the relatively affluent peasantry, and to urban communities in society, and their rural hinterlands with offers of protection and opportunities for them to express their social status with reference to tomb-centred sanctity.
Barbara W. Tuchman—the acclaimed author of the Pulitzer Prize–winning classic The Guns of August—once again marshals her gift for character, history, and sparkling prose to compose an astonishing portrait of medieval Europe.
 
The fourteenth century reflects two contradictory images: on the one hand, a glittering age of crusades, cathedrals, and chivalry; on the other, a world plunged into chaos and spiritual agony. In this revelatory work, Barbara W. Tuchman examines not only the great rhythms of history but the grain and texture of domestic life: what childhood was like; what marriage meant; how money, taxes, and war dominated the lives of serf, noble, and clergy alike. Granting her subjects their loyalties, treacheries, and guilty passions, Tuchman re-creates the lives of proud cardinals, university scholars, grocers and clerks, saints and mystics, lawyers and mercenaries, and, dominating all, the knight—in all his valor and “furious follies,” a “terrible worm in an iron cocoon.”
 
Praise for A Distant Mirror
 
“Beautifully written, careful and thorough in its scholarship . . . What Ms. Tuchman does superbly is to tell how it was. . . . No one has ever done this better.”—The New York Review of Books
 
“A beautiful, extraordinary book . . . Tuchman at the top of her powers . . . She has done nothing finer.”—The Wall Street Journal
 
“Wise, witty, and wonderful . . . a great book, in a great historical tradition.”—Commentary

NOTE: This edition does not include color images.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.