Just Living Together: Implications of Cohabitation on Families, Children, and Social Policy

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Based on the presentations and discussions from a national symposia, Just Living Together represents one of the first systematic efforts to focus on cohabitation. The book is divided into four parts, each dealing with a different aspect of cohabitation. Part I addresses the big picture question, "What are the historical and cross cultural foundations of cohabitation?" Part II focuses specifically on North America and asks, "What is the role of cohabitation in contemporary North American family structure?" Part III turns the focus to the question, "What is the long- and short-term impact of cohabitation on child well-being?" Part IV addresses how cohabiting couples are affected by current policies and what policy innovations could be introduced to support these couples.

Providing a road map for future research, program development, and policymaking. Just Living Together will serve as an important resource for people interested in learning about variations in the ways families of today are choosing to organize themselves.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Feb 1, 2002
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781135643959
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Psychology / Developmental / Adulthood & Aging
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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