The Cellphone: The History and Technology of the Gadget That Changed the World

McFarland
2
Free sample

Presenting the history of the cellular phone from its beginnings in the 1940s to the present, this book explains the fundamental concepts involved in wireless communication along with the ramifications of cellular technology on the economy, U.S. and international law, human health, and society. The first two chapters deal with bandwidth and radio. Subsequent chapters look at precursors to the contemporary cellphone, including the surprisingly popular car phone of the 1970s, the analog cellphones of the 1980s and early 1990s, and the basic digital phones which preceded the feature-laden, multipurpose devices of today.
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About the author

Guy Klemens holds a doctorate in electrical engineering and has worked in various aspects of the wireless communication field for more than 15 years. He lives in San Diego, California.
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3.5
2 total
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Additional Information

Publisher
McFarland
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Published on
May 17, 2013
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Pages
224
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ISBN
9780786459964
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Language
English
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Genres
History / General
Social Science / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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