La Seduction: How the French Play the Game of Life

Sold by Macmillan
1
Free sample

The hidden truth about the French way of life: it's all about seduction—its rules, its pleasures, its secrets

France is a seductive country, seductive in its elegance, its beauty, its sensual pleasures, and its joie de vivre. But Elaine Sciolino, the longtime Paris bureau chief of The New York Times, has discovered that seduction is much more than a game to the French: it is the key to understanding France.

Seduction plays a crucial role in how the French relate to one another—not just in romantic relationships but also in how they conduct business, enjoy food and drink, define style, engage in intellectual debate, elect politicians, and project power around the world. While sexual repartee and conquest remain at the heart of seduction, for the French seduction has become a philosophy of life, even an ideology, that can confuse outsiders.

In La Seduction, Sciolino gives us an inside view of how seduction works in all areas, analyzing its limits as well as its power. She demystifies the French way of life in an entertaining and personal narrative that carries us from the neighborhood shops of Paris to the halls of government, from the gardens of Versailles to the agricultural heartland.

La Seduction will charm you and encourage you to lower your defenses about the French. Pull up a chair and let Elaine Sciolino seduce you.

Read more

About the author

Elaine Sciolino is the author of the award-winning book Persian Mirrors: The Elusive Face of Iran. She is a Paris correspondent and former Paris bureau chief for The New York Times, having previously served as the newspaper's chief diplomatic correspondent and UN bureau chief. In 2010, she was decorated a chevalier of the Legion of Honor. She has also been a foreign correspondent for Newsweek, based in Paris and Rome. She lives in Paris with her husband.
Read more
4.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Macmillan
Read more
Published on
Jun 7, 2011
Read more
Pages
352
Read more
ISBN
9781429933292
Read more
Features
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Social Science / Anthropology / Cultural & Social
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
No American reporter has more experience covering Iran or more access to the private corners of Iranian society than Elaine Sciolino. As a correspondent for Newsweek and The New York Times, she has reported on the key events of the past two decades. She was aboard the airplane that brought Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to Tehran in 1979; she was there for the Iranian revolution, the hostage crisis, the Iran-Iraq war, the rise of President Mohammad Khatami, and the riots of the summer of 1999.
In Persian Mirrors, Sciolino takes us into the public and private spaces of Iran -- the bazaars, beauty salons, aerobics studios, courtrooms, universities, mosques, and the presidential palace -- to capture the vitality of a society so often misunderstood by Americans. She demystifies a country of endless complexity where, on the streets, women swathe themselves in black and, behind high walls, they adorn themselves with makeup and jewelry; where the laws of Islam are the law of the land, and yet the government advertises as tourist attractions the ruins of the pre-Islamic imperial capital at Persepolis and the synagogue where Queen Esther is said to be buried; and where even the most austere clerics recite sensual romantic poetry, insisting that it refers to divine, and not earthly, love. Iran is also a place with a dark side, where unpredictable repression is carried out, officially and unofficially, by forces intent on maintaining power and influence.
Sciolino deftly uses her travels throughout Iran and her encounters with its people to portray the country as an exciting, daring laboratory where experiments with two highly volatile chemicals -- Islam and democracy -- are being conducted.
Like the mirror mosaics found in Iran's royal palaces and religious shrines, there is more to the whole of the country than the fragments revealed to outsiders. Persian Mirrors captures this elusive Iran. Sciolino paints in astonishing detail and rich color the surprising inner life of this country, where a great battle is raging, not for control over territory but for the soul of the nation.
No American reporter has more experience covering Iran or more access to the private corners of Iranian society than Elaine Sciolino. As a correspondent for Newsweek and The New York Times, she has reported on the key events of the past two decades. She was aboard the airplane that brought Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to Tehran in 1979; she was there for the Iranian revolution, the hostage crisis, the Iran-Iraq war, the rise of President Mohammad Khatami, and the riots of the summer of 1999.
In Persian Mirrors, Sciolino takes us into the public and private spaces of Iran -- the bazaars, beauty salons, aerobics studios, courtrooms, universities, mosques, and the presidential palace -- to capture the vitality of a society so often misunderstood by Americans. She demystifies a country of endless complexity where, on the streets, women swathe themselves in black and, behind high walls, they adorn themselves with makeup and jewelry; where the laws of Islam are the law of the land, and yet the government advertises as tourist attractions the ruins of the pre-Islamic imperial capital at Persepolis and the synagogue where Queen Esther is said to be buried; and where even the most austere clerics recite sensual romantic poetry, insisting that it refers to divine, and not earthly, love. Iran is also a place with a dark side, where unpredictable repression is carried out, officially and unofficially, by forces intent on maintaining power and influence.
Sciolino deftly uses her travels throughout Iran and her encounters with its people to portray the country as an exciting, daring laboratory where experiments with two highly volatile chemicals -- Islam and democracy -- are being conducted.
Like the mirror mosaics found in Iran's royal palaces and religious shrines, there is more to the whole of the country than the fragments revealed to outsiders. Persian Mirrors captures this elusive Iran. Sciolino paints in astonishing detail and rich color the surprising inner life of this country, where a great battle is raging, not for control over territory but for the soul of the nation.
 ※亞馬遜4.4顆星;紐約時報、紐約客、華盛頓郵報、BBC選書國際好評推薦。※《紐約時報》前駐巴黎總編輯,文筆流暢觀察細膩,寫出一篇給居住街區的情書。

這是一條觀光客不得其門而入的街
「看著殉道者街,有些人看到的是一條街,而我看到的是故事。」
  身為《紐約時報》前駐巴黎總編輯,秀黎諾看過所有法國最精緻的一面。但遍歷繁華之後,她想重新見證的,是最純粹、最道地,當地人所享受而觀光客不得其門而入的巴黎。

  離開第七區(艾菲爾鐵塔等名勝、使館、國家機構、高級住宅區)精美繁複的街坊,她跨過塞納河,到了中產階級與勞工混居的殉道者街。這條長度八百多公尺的街道或許不會登上旅遊指南,缺少旅人心中的紙醉金迷,但它精準保存了巴黎最親暱、最富熱情,也最原初本真,屬於老巴黎人的巴黎。這裡沒有星巴克、H&M和Sephora,但這兒的小店可以教你用手指感受起司的熱情、會把正牌愛馬仕的絲巾藏在標價2歐元的二手衣物籃裡做驚喜,也會把一大簍怎麼吃都吃不完的蔓越莓對折再對折賣給你,再送一罐鮮榨橄欖油。而走在街頭,一聲聲「日安」出自晚上兼任業餘歷史學家的投顧公司經理、隨著鐘聲而來的磨刀人、還有喜歡修理水銀氣壓計的工匠,這樣一群繽紛的人們口中;而你眼睛如果夠銳利,還能看見巴爾札克、秀拉和楚浮的鬼魂,仍晃蕩在街頭,手中提著筆,準備寫、畫、記錄下他們眼中最美麗的殉道者街……

  秀黎諾效法路易-薩巴斯欽.梅爾西耶這位十八世紀的作家兼巴黎第一位街頭記者,漫遊在這微縮在半英哩之中,最濃烈也迷人的巴黎,記錄各階級各行各業的人味、記憶與風情。既真實,也完美,在許多人心底,殉道者街就是巴黎的中心。
©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.