Tenure in the Sacred Grove: Issues and Strategies for Women and Minority Faculty

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Designed to help women and minority faculty navigate a path to tenure in academe, this book looks at the political, scholarly, personal and interpersonal issues. Filled with the experiences and advice of those who have navigated this terrain successfully, despite obstacles and setbacks, it includes considerations for women, faculty of color, and gay/lesbian/bisexual faculty, addressing racism, sexism and ageism in the academy. The contributors provide guidance in a multitude of areas such as coping with feelings of fraudulence, making a persuasive tenure case, balancing work and family, as well as practical advice on teaching, research and publication, and the scholarship of outreach. Contributors include tenured faculty, journal editors, department chairs, campus promotion and tenure chairs, and university presidents.
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About the author

Joanne E. Cooper is Associate Professor of Education at the University of Hawaii and Dannelle D. Stevens is Associate Professor of Curriculum and Instruction at Portland State University.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Pages
264
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ISBN
9780791488959
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / Higher
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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"This is the book I wish that I'd had years ago when I first started experimenting with journals in my classes. I commend it highly, and believe it has the potential to bring journaling into more widespread and effective practice in reflective learning."--Teaching Theology and Religion

"A superb tool for educators who want to be reflective practitioners, and help their students become reflective learners. I hope this fine book will be widely read and used."--Parker J. Palmer, author of The Courage to Teach

"Stevens and Cooper offer multiple possibilities for readers to use journaling for personal growth, fostering their own and others' learning, and managing professional life."--Marcia B. Baxter Magolda, Distinguished Professor of Educational Leadership at the Miami University of Ohio

"An impressively complete and well organized exploration of the uses of journal writing. It provides rich backing for John Dewey's key insight, namely that it's not experience that makes us learn, it's reflection on experience."--Peter Elbow, author of Writing with Power

One of the most powerful ways to learn, reflect and make sense of our lives is through journal keeping.

This book presents the potential uses and benefits of journals for personal and professional development--particularly for those in academic life; and demonstrates journals' potential to foster college students' learning, fluency and voice, and creative thinking.

The authors present the background to help readers make an informed decision about the value of journals and to determine whether journals will fit appropriately with their teaching objectives or help manage their personal and professional lives. They offer insights and advice on selecting the format or formats and techniques most appropriate for the reader's purposes.
Something is going wrong on many college campuses in the last few years. Rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide are rising. Speakers are shouted down. Students and professors say they are walking on eggshells and afraid to speak honestly. How did this happen?
 
First Amendment expert Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt show how the new problems on campus have their origins in three terrible ideas that have become increasingly woven into American childhood and education: what doesn’t kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people. These three Great Untruths are incompatible with basic psychological principles, as well as ancient wisdom from many cultures. They interfere with healthy development. Anyone who embraces these untruths—and the resulting culture of safetyism—is less likely to become an autonomous adult able to navigate the bumpy road of life.
 
Lukianoff and Haidt investigate the many social trends that have intersected to produce these untruths. They situate the conflicts on campus in the context of America’s rapidly rising political polarization, including a rise in hate crimes and off-campus provocation. They explore changes in childhood including the rise of fearful parenting, the decline of unsupervised play, and the new world of social media that has engulfed teenagers in the last decade.
 
This is a book for anyone who is confused by what is happening on college campuses today, or has children, or is concerned about the growing inability of Americans to live, work, and cooperate across party lines.
A groundbreaking manifesto about what our nation’s top schools should be—but aren’t—providing: “The ex-Yale professor effectively skewers elite colleges, their brainy but soulless students (those ‘sheep’), pushy parents, and admissions mayhem” (People).

As a professor at Yale, William Deresiewicz saw something that troubled him deeply. His students, some of the nation’s brightest minds, were adrift when it came to the big questions: how to think critically and creatively and how to find a sense of purpose. Now he argues that elite colleges are turning out conformists without a compass.

Excellent Sheep takes a sharp look at the high-pressure conveyor belt that begins with parents and counselors who demand perfect grades and culminates in the skewed applications Deresiewicz saw firsthand as a member of Yale’s admissions committee. As schools shift focus from the humanities to “practical” subjects like economics, students are losing the ability to think independently. It is essential, says Deresiewicz, that college be a time for self-discovery, when students can establish their own values and measures of success in order to forge their own paths. He features quotes from real students and graduates he has corresponded with over the years, candidly exposing where the system is broken and offering clear solutions on how to fix it.

“Excellent Sheep is likely to make…a lasting mark….He takes aim at just about the entirety of upper-middle-class life in America….Mr. Deresiewicz’s book is packed full of what he wants more of in American life: passionate weirdness” (The New York Times).
In this book Dr. Dannelle D. Stevens offers five key principles that will bolster your knowledge of academic writing, enable you to develop a manageable, sustainable, and even enjoyable writing practice, and, in the process, effectively increase your publication output and promote your academic career.

A successful and productive book and journal article author, writing coach, creator of a nationally-recognized, cross-disciplinary faculty writing program, and with a long career as a faculty member and experience as a department chair, Dr. Stevens offers a unique combination of motivation, reflective practices, analytical tools, templates, and advice to set you on the path to being a productive and creative writer.

Drawing on her experience as a writer and on her extensive research into the psychology of writing and the craft of scholarly writing, Dr. Stevens starts from the premise that most faculty have never been taught to write and that writers, both experienced and novice, frequently experience anxiety and self-doubt that erode confidence. She begins by guiding readers to understand themselves as writers and discover what has impeded or stimulated them in the past to establish positive new attitudes and sustainable habits.

Dr. Stevens provides strategies for setting doable goals, organizing a more productive writing life, and demonstrates the benefits of writing groups, including offering a variety of ways in which you can experiment with collaborative practice. In addition, she offers a series of reflections, exercises, and activities to spark your writing fluency and creativity.

Whether developing journal articles, book chapters, book proposals, book reviews, or conference proposals, this book will help you demystify the hidden structures and common patterns in academic writing and help you match your manuscript to the language, structures, and conventions of your discipline--be it in the sciences, social sciences, or humanities.

Most importantly, believing that connecting your passions with your work is essential to stimulating your ideas and enthusiasm, this essential guide offers you the knowledge and skills to write more.
The definitive career guide for grad students, adjuncts, post-docs and anyone else eager to get tenure or turn their Ph.D.  into their ideal job
 
Each year tens of thousands of students will, after years of hard work and enormous amounts of money, earn their Ph.D. And each year only a small percentage of them will land a job that justifies and rewards their investment. For every comfortably tenured professor or well-paid former academic, there are countless underpaid and overworked adjuncts, and many more who simply give up in frustration.
 
Those who do make it share an important asset that separates them from the pack: they have a plan. They understand exactly what they need to do to set themselves up for success.  They know what really moves the needle in academic job searches, how to avoid the all-too-common mistakes that sink so many of their peers, and how to decide when to point their Ph.D. toward other, non-academic options.
 
Karen Kelsky has made it her mission to help readers join the select few who get the most out of their Ph.D. As a former tenured professor and department head who oversaw numerous academic job searches, she knows from experience exactly what gets an academic applicant a job. And as the creator of the popular and widely respected advice site The Professor is In, she has helped countless Ph.D.’s turn themselves into stronger applicants and land their dream careers.
 
Now, for the first time ever, Karen has poured all her best advice into a single handy guide that addresses the most important issues facing any Ph.D., including:
 
-When, where, and what to publish
-Writing a foolproof grant application
-Cultivating references and crafting the perfect CV
-Acing the job talk and campus interview
-Avoiding the adjunct trap
-Making the leap to nonacademic work, when the time is right
 
The Professor Is In addresses all of these issues, and many more.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
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