Extinct Birds

Bloomsbury Publishing
Free sample

Extinct Birds was the first comprehensive review of the hundreds of the bird species and subspecies that have become extinct over the last 1,000 years of habitat degradation, over-hunting and rat introduction. It has become the standard text on this subject, covering both familiar icons of extinction as well as more obscure birds, some known from just one specimen or from travellers' tales. This second edition is expanded to include dozens of new species, as more are constantly added to the list, either through extinction or through new subfossil discoveries.

Extinct Birds is the result of decades of research into literature and museum drawers, as well as caves and subfossil deposits, which often reveal birds long-gone that disappeared without ever being recorded by scientists while they lived. From Greak Auks, Carolina Parakeets and Dodos to the amazing yet almost completely vanished bird radiations of Hawaii and New Zealand via rafts of extinction in the Pacific and elsewhere, this book is both a sumptuous reference and astounding testament to humanity's devastating impact on wildlife.
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About the author

After becoming established as a self taught artist specialising in reconstructing extinct species, Julian P. Hume undertook a PhD at the Natural History Museum, London. Julian now works as an author and artist at the Natural History Museum in Tring and has a long record of describing species new to science. An expert on the extinct birds of the Indian Ocean, he has dug for Dodos on Mauritius, searched for flightless pigeons on the Comoros, and undertaken many other research expeditions around the world. His previous books include Lost Land of the Dodo (Poyser, 2008) and Extinct Birds (Poyser, 2011).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing
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Published on
Aug 24, 2017
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Pages
560
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ISBN
9781472937469
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Nature / Animals / Birds
Nature / Birdwatching Guides
Nature / Endangered Species
Nature / Environmental Conservation & Protection
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / Ornithology
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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