The FIRE Economy: New Zealand’s Reckoning

Bridget Williams Books
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The FIRE economy – built on finance, insurance and real estate – is now the world’s principal source of wealth creation. Its rise has transformed our political, economic and social landscapes, supported by a neoliberal regime that celebrates markets, profit and risk. From rising inequality and ballooning household debt to a global financial crisis and fiscal austerity, the neoliberal ‘orthodoxy’ has brought instability and empowered the few. Yet it remains remarkably resilient, even resurgent, in New Zealand and abroad.

In 1995 Jane Kelsey set out a groundbreaking account of the neoliberal revolution in The New Zealand Experiment. Now she marshals an exceptional range of evidence to show how this transfer of wealth and power has been systematically embedded over three decades.

Today organisations and commentators once at the vanguard of neoliberal reform, including the IMF and Financial Times journalist Martin Wolf, are warning the current model is unsustainable. A post-neoliberal era beckons. In The FIRE Economy Kelsey identifies the risks posed by FIRE and the barriers embedded neoliberalism presents to a progressive, post-neoliberal transformation – and urges us to act. This is a book New Zealand cannot afford to ignore.
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About the author

Jane Kelsey is Professor of Law at the University of Auckland and a prominent social commentator. Her books include No Ordinary Deal: Unmasking the Trans-Pacific Partnership Free Trade Agreement (ed.,
BWB, 2010), Reclaiming the Future: New Zealand and the Global Economy (BWB, 1999) and The New Zealand Experiment: A World Model for Structural Adjustment? (AUP/BWB, 1995).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
Jul 13, 2015
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Pages
344
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ISBN
9781927247839
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Economics / General
Political Science / World / Australian & Oceanian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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