English Local Prisons, 1860-1900: Next Only to Death

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The local prisons of the latter half of the nineteenth century refined systems of punishment so harsh that one judge considered the maximum penalty of two years local imprisonment to be the most severe punishment known to English law: "next only to death". This work examines how private perceptions and concerns became public policy. It also traces the move in English government from the rural and aristocratic to the urban and more democratic. It follows the rise of the powerful elite of the higher civil service, describes some of the forces that attempted to oppose it, and provides a window through which to view the process of state formation.
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About the author

Faculty of Laws, Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Oct 24, 2018
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Pages
834
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ISBN
9781136104046
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Language
English
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Genres
History / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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