Dialogues of Lucian. From the Greek: Volume 1

Printed ... for W. Flexney
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Printed ... for W. Flexney
Read more
Published on
Dec 31, 1774
Read more
Pages
440
Read more
Read more
Best For
Read more
Language
English
Read more
Genres
Dialogues, Greek
Greek literature
Literary Criticism / Ancient & Classical
Satire, Greek
Read more
Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
Read more

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Lucian of Samosata is celebrated for lively and original satires, which demonstrate his cynical wit and critical interpretation of Greek literature.  Well-regarded for his Attic purity and the elegance of his Greek, Lucian is now recognised as one of the first true modern innovators of literature. Delphi’s Ancient Classics series provides eReaders with the wisdom of the Classical world, with both English translations and the original Greek texts.  For the first time in digital publishing, this comprehensive eBook presents Lucian’s complete extant works, with beautiful illustrations, rare translations, informative introductions and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)


* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Lucian's life and works

* Features the complete extant works of Lucian, in both English translation and the original Greek

* Concise introductions to the famous satires

* Includes translations by H. W. Fowler and F. G. Fowler (Oxford University Press) and by A. M. Harmon (Loeb Classical Library)

* Excellent formatting of the texts

* Includes many rare translations of Pseudo-Lucian works, available in no other collection

* Lucian’s ‘Epigrams’, translated by W. R. Paton in the Loeb Classical Library ‘Greek Anthology’ editions

* Features two bonus biographies – discover Lucian's ancient world

* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres


Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to explore our range of Ancient Classics titles or buy the entire series as a Super Set


CONTENTS:


The Translations

PHALARIS 1 — Φάλαρις Α

PHALARIS 2 — Φάλαρις Β

HIPPIAS — Ἱππίας ἢ Βαλανεῖον

DIONYSUS — Διόνυσος

HERACLES — Ἡρακλῆς

AMBER; OR, THE SWANS — Περὶ τοῦ Ἡλέκτρου ἢ Κύκνων

THE FLY — Μυίας Ἐγκώμιον

NIGRINUS — Νιγρίνου Φιλοσοφία

DEMONAX — Δημώνακτος Βίος

CONCERNING A HALL — Περὶ τοῦ Οἴκου

MY NATIVE LAND — Πατρίδος Ἐγκώμιον

OCTOGENERIANS — Μακρόβιοι

A TRUE STORY — Ἀληθῶν Διηγημάτων

SLANDER — Περὶ τοῦ μὴ ῥᾳδίως πιστεύειν Διαβολῇ

THE CONSONANTS AT LAW — Δίκη Συμφώνων

THE CAROUSAL SYMPOSIUM OR THE LAPITHS — Συμπόσιον ἢ Λαπίθαι

SOLOECISTA — Ψευδοσοφιστής ἢ Σολοικιστής

THE DOWNWARD JOURNEY OR THE TYRANT — Κατάπλους ἢ Τύραννος

ZEUS CATECHIZED (ZEUS CROSS-EXAMINED) — Ζεὺς ἐλεγχόμενος

ZEUS RANTS — Ζεὺς Τραγῳδός

THE COCK — Ὄνειρος ἢ Ἀλεκτρυών

PROMETHEUS — Προμηθεύς

ICAROMENIPPUS OR THE SKY-MAN — Ἰκαρομένιππος ἢ Ὑπερνέφελος

TIMON OR THE MISANTHROPE — Τίμων

CHARON OR THE INSPECTORS — Χάρων ἢ Ἐπισκοποῦντες

SALE OF CREEDS — Βίων Πρᾶσις

THE FISHERMAN — Ἀναβιοῦντες ἢ Ἁλιεύς

THE DOUBLE INDICTMENT — Δὶς κατηγορούμενος

ON SACRIFICES — Περὶ Θυσιῶν

REMARKS ADDRESSED TO AN ILLITERATE BOOK-FANCIER — Πρὸς τὸν ἀπαίδευτον καὶ πολλὰ βιβλία ὠνούμενον

THE DREAM OR LUCIAN’S CAREER — Περὶ τοῦ Ἐνυπνίου ἤτοι Βίος Λουκιανοῦ

THE PARASITE: PARASITIC AN ART — Περὶ τοῦ Παρασίτου ὅτι Τέχνη ἡ Παρασιτική

THE LOVER OF LIES — Φιλοψευδής ἢ Ἀπιστῶν

THE JUDGEMENT OF THE GODDESSES — Θεῶν Κρίσις

ON SALARIED POSTS IN GREAT HOUSES — Περὶ τῶν ἐν Μισθῷ συνόντων

ANACHARSIS — Ἀνάχαρσις ἢ Περὶ Γυμνασίων

MENIPPUS — Μένιππος ἢ Νεκυομαντεία

LUCIUS; OR, THE ASS — Λούκιος ἢ Ὄνος

ON FUNERALS (ON MOURNING) — Περὶ Πένθους

A PROFESSOR OF PUBLIC SPEAKING — Ῥητόρων Διδάσκαλος

ALEXANDER THE FALSE PROPHET — Ἀλέξανδρος ἢ Ψευδόμαντις

ESSAYS IN PORTRAITURE — Εἰκόνες

ESSAYS IN PORTRAITURE DEFENDED — Ὑπὲρ τῶν Εἰκόνων

THE SYRIAN GODDESS — Περὶ τῆς Συρίης Θεοῦ

OF PANTOMIME — Περὶ Ὀρχήσεως

LEXIPHANES — Λεξιφάνης

THE EUNUCH — Εὐνοῦχος

ASTROLOGY — Περὶ τῆς Ἀστρολογίας

AMORES — Ἔρωτες

THE MISTAKEN CRITIC — Ψευδολογιστής

THE PARLIAMENT OF THE GODS — Θεῶν Ἐκκλησία

THE TYRANNICIDE — Τυραννοκτόνος

DISOWNED — Ἀποκηρυττόμενος

THE PASSING OF PEREGRINUS — Περὶ τῆς Περεγρίνου Τελευτῆς

THE RUNAWAYS — Δραπέται

TOXARIS — Τόξαρις ἢ Φιλία

DEMOSTHENES — Δημοσθένους Ἐγκώμιον

HOW TO WRITE HISTORY — Πῶς δεῖ Ἱστορίαν συγγράφειν

THE DIPSADS — Περὶ τῶν Διψάδων

SATURNALIA — Τὰ πρὸς Κρόνον

HERODOTUS OR AETION — Ἡρόδοτος ἢ Ἀετίων

ZEUXIS OR ANTIOCHUS — Ζεύξις ἢ Ἀντίοχος

A SLIP OF THE TONGUE IN GREETING — Ὑπὲρ τοῦ ἐν τῇ Προσαγορεύσει Πταίσματος

APOLOGY FOR THE “SALARIED POSTS IN GREAT HOUSES” — Ἀπολογία

HARMONIDES — Ἁρμονίδης

A CONVERSATION WITH HESIOD — Διάλογος πρὸς Ἡσίοδον

THE SCYTHIAN OR THE CONSUL — Σκύθης ἢ Πρόξενος

PODAGRA; OR, GOUT — Ποδάγρα

HERMOTIMUS — Ἑρμότιμος ἢ Περὶ Αἱρέσεων

A LITERARY PROMETHEUS — Πρὸς τὸν εἰπόντα Προμηθεὺς εἶ ἐν λόγοις

HALCYON — Ἀλκυὼν ἢ Περὶ Μεταμορφώσεων

THE SHIP; OR, THE WISHES — Πλοἶον ἢ Εὐχαί

OCYPUS; OR, SWIFT-OF-FOOT — Ὠκύπους

CYNICUS (THE CYNIC) — Κυνικός

DIALOGUES OF THE DEAD — Νεκρικοὶ Διάλογοι

DIALOGUES OF THE SEA-GODS — Ἐνάλιοι Διάλογοι

DIALOGUES OF THE GODS — Θεῶν Διάλογοι

DIALOGUES OF THE COURTESANS — Ἑταιρικοὶ Διάλογοι

The Spurious Works

LETTERS — Ἐπιστολαί

PHILOPATRIS; OR, THE PATRIOT — Φιλόπατρις ἢ Διδασκόμενος

CHARIDEMUS — Χαρίδημος ἢ Περὶ Κάλλους

NERO — Νέρων

EPIGRAMS — Ἐπιγράμματα


The Greek Texts

LIST OF GREEK TEXTS


The Biographies

INTRODUCTION TO LUCIAN by H. W. Fowler and F. G. Fowler

INTRODUCTION TO LUCIAN by A. M. Harmon


Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of exciting titles


On 28th October 1940, the Greek premier, Ioannis Metaxis, refused to accept a deliberately provocative ultimatum from Mussolini and Italian forces began the invasion of Greece via Albania. This aggression was prompted by Mussolini's desire for a quick victory to rival Hitler's rapid conquest of France and the Low Countries. On paper, Greek forces were poorly equipped and ill-prepared for the conflict but Mussolini had underestimated the skill and determination of the defenders. Within weeks the Italian invasion force was driven back over the border and Greek forces actually advanced deep into Albania.??A renewed Italian offensive in March 1941 was also given short shrift, prompting Hitler to intervene to save his ally. German forces invaded Greece via Bulgaria on 6 April. The Greeks, now assisted by British forces, resisted by land, sea and air but were overwhelmed by the superior German forces and their blitzkrieg tactics. Despite a dogged rearguard action by Anzac forces at the famous pass of Thermopyale, Athens fell on the 27th April and the British evacuated 50,000 troops to Crete. This island, whose airfields and naval bases Churchill considered vital to the defence of Egypt and the Suez Canal, was invaded by German airborne troops the following month and eventually captured after a bitter thirteen-day battle. The remaining British troops were evacuated and the fall of Greece completed. ??John Carr's masterful account of these desperate campaigns, while not disparaging the British and Commonwealth assistance, draws heavily on Greek sources to emphasize the oft-neglected experience of the Greeks themselves and their contribution to the fight against fascism.
Example in this ebook


It is a commonplace of criticism that Lucian was the first of the moderns, but in truth he is near to our time because of all the ancients he is nearest to his own. With Petronius he shared the discovery that there is material for literature in the debased and various life of every day—that to the seeing eye the individual is more wonderful in colour and complexity than the severely simple abstraction of the poets. He replaced the tradition, respected of his fathers, by an observation more vivid and less pedantic than the note-book of the naturalist. He set the world in the dry light of truth, and since the vanity of mankind is a constant factor throughout the ages, there is scarce a page of Lucian's writing that wears the faded air of antiquity. His personages are as familiar to-day as they were in the second century, because, with his pitiless determination to unravel the tangled skein of human folly, he never blinded his vision to their true qualities. And the multiplicity of his interest is as fresh as his penetration. Nothing came amiss to his eager curiosity. For the first time in the history of literature (with the doubtful exception of Cicero) we encounter a writer whose ceaseless activity includes the world. While others had declared themselves poets, historians, philosophers, Lucian comes forth as a man of letters. Had he lived to-day, he would have edited a newspaper, written leading articles, and kept his name ever before the public in the magazines. For he possessed the qualities, if he avoided the defects, of the journalist. His phrase had not been worn by constant use to imbecility; his sentences were not marred by the association of commonness; his style was still his own and fit for the expression of a personal view. But he noted such types and incidents as make an immediate, if perennial, appeal, and to study him is to be convinced that literature and journalism are not necessarily divorced.

The profession was new, and with the joy of the innovator Lucian was never tired of inventing new genres. Romance, criticism, satire—he mastered them all. In Toxaris and The Ass he proves with what delicacy and restraint he could handle the story. His ill-omened apprenticeship to a sculptor gave him that taste and feeling for art which he turned to so admirable an account. He was, in fact, the first of the art-critics, and he pursued the craft with an easy unconsciousness of the heritage he bequeathed to the world. True, he is silent concerning the technical practice of the Greeks; true, he leaves us in profound ignorance of the art of Zeuxis, whose secrets he might have revealed, had he been less a man of letters. But he found in painting and sculpture an opportunity for elegance of phrase, and we would forgive a thousand shortcomings for such inspirations of beauty as the smile of Sosandra: to τὸ μειδίαμα σεμνὸν καὶ λεληθὸς. In literary criticism he was on surer ground, and here also he leaves the past behind. His knowledge of Greek poetry was profound; Homer he had by heart; and on every page he proves his sympathies by covert allusion or precise quotation. His treatise concerning the Writing of History[1] preserves its force irresistible after seventeen centuries, nor has the wisdom of the ages impeached or modified this lucid argument. 


To be continue in this ebook

©2018 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.