The Sweetpotato

Springer Science & Business Media
1
Free sample

In the last four decades of the twentieth century the use of sweetpotato was diversified beyond their classification as subsistence, food security, and famine-relief crop. In developing countries they serve both as human food and for feeding livestock. In Western countries they appeal to health conscious consumers because of their nutritional aspects. The sweetpotato is very high in nutritive value, and merits wider use on this account alone. The book has 2 parts. A general one giving up-to-date information on the history, botany, cultivars, genetic engineering, propagation, diseases and pests, nutritional data and marketing; and a second part presenting data on sweetpotato growing practices in different areas of the world. The information should be useful to researchers, practitioners and crop administrators in different countries.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Gad Loebenstein. Ph.D. Graduated from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and joined the Agricultural Research Organization, Volcani Center, Israel. He served as Head of the Department pf Plant Virology, Director pf the Agricultural Research Organization and Chief Scientist of the Ministry of Agriculture. His major research interests are plant virus diseases and natural resistance mechanisms of plants to viruses. His published work includes more than 200 scientific and technical papers. He was appointed as Adjunct Professor at the Hebrew University and at the Tel Aviv University, and at the latter as Professor Emeritus. He is a Fellow of the American Phytopathological Society, a Corresponding Member at the German Phytomedizinische Society and a member of the Kazakh Academy for Agriculture. In 1982 he received the Rothschild Prize for Agriculture. Dr. John P. CarrPhD in UK with Michael Wilson (1980-83), Postdoc with Dan Klessig (University of Utah and Rutgers University: 1984-1989), Research Associate with Milton Zaitlin (Cornell University: 1989-1993), own research group at Cambridge University since 1993 (Senior Lecturer in Molecular Plant Pathology).

Read more
Collapse
5.0
1 total
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Springer Science & Business Media
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Mar 21, 2009
Read more
Collapse
Pages
522
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9781402094750
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Science / Life Sciences / Biochemistry
Science / Life Sciences / Botany
Science / Life Sciences / Horticulture
Science / Life Sciences / Zoology / Invertebrates
Technology & Engineering / Agriculture / General
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
The major objective of this book is to highlight the significance of phytonematodes in horticulture. Detailed and latest information on major aspects of phytonematodes associated exclusively with horticultural crops, which is the need of the day, is lacking. Hence, the book has been written mainly with the objective of providing its readers, comprehensive information on the advanced aspects related to phytonematodes associated with horticultural crops. It also provides basic information on plant parasitic nematodes since it is required for a better understanding of advanced topics. Several popular topics, information on which is already available in plenty, have been avoided. Thus, book explicates both the essential fundamental and advanced aspects pertaining to nematodes associated with horticultural crops.

The book is conveniently divided into 13 chapters, which cover latest information on the major fundamental and advanced aspects related to phytonematodes including the role of phytonematodes in horticultural industry, phylogenetic and evolutionary concepts in nematodes, major phytonematodes associated with horticultural crops and their diagnostic keys, symptoms caused by phytonematodes and disease diagnosis, nematode population threshold levels, crop loss assessment, nematode diseases of horticultural crops and their management, nematode disease complexes, genetics of nematode parasitism, important nematological techniques and nematodes of quarantine importance. An exclusive chapter on novel methods of nematode management has been included mainly to provide the information on the latest molecules and novel modes of managing nematodes attacking horticultural crops. Routine nematode management aspects, information on which is already available, have not been discussed; instead, this topic reflects the changing scenario of future nematode management.

Hence, this book can serve as a friendly guide to meet the requirements of the students, teachers and researchers interested in these ‘hidden enemies’ of the grower, apart from the research and extension personnel working under Public organizations, officials of State departments of Horticulture, Forestry, field workers and all those concerned and working with plant parasitic nematodes. Appropriate diagrams, convincing tables and suitable graphs/illustrations have been furnished at right places. A complete bibliography has also been included.

When I conceived this book, what I had in mind was what I did not know about coffee-parasitic nematodes (CPNs). Indeed, after reading many papers and several chapters in books, I felt far from having a comprehensive understanding of the subject. Not only would it be a daunting task to retrieve the numerous articles, reports, theses and dissertations on CPNs published since 1878, but it would also be impossible to learn, on my own, from all the enormous experience acquired by nematologists and coffee growers in so many countries. Therefore, this book is dedicated to those with restless minds, who want to know more about CPNs and their importance in coffee production worldwide. This book has been diligently written by top scientists in their areas of expertise or country, and it has been meticulously edited to guarantee precision without compromising an enjoyable read. I learned a lot from this book...I’m sure you will too. Finally, I’d like to thank Zuzana Bernhart from Springer, who believed in this project and decided to publish it; Susan Casement, who revised all chapters for grammatical correctness; and all the contributors, without whom this book would never have became a reality. Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ, Brazil Ricardo M. Souza vii Contents Part I The Crop 1 Coffee: The Plant and its Cultivation............................. 3 Henrique D. Vieira 2 The Coffee Industry: History and Future Perspectives.............. 19 Denis O. Seudieu Part II The Root-Lesion Nematode, Pratylenchus spp.
The book that helped make Michael Pollan, the New York Times bestselling author of Cooked and The Omnivore’s Dilemma, one of the most trusted food experts in America

In 1637, one Dutchman paid as much for a single tulip bulb as the going price of a town house in Amsterdam. Three and a half centuries later, Amsterdam is once again the mecca for people who care passionately about one particular plant—though this time the obsessions revolves around the intoxicating effects of marijuana rather than the visual beauty of the tulip. How could flowers, of all things, become such objects of desire that they can drive men to financial ruin?

In The Botany of Desire, Michael Pollan argues that the answer lies at the heart of the intimately reciprocal relationship between people and plants. In telling the stories of four familiar plant species that are deeply woven into the fabric of our lives, Pollan illustrates how they evolved to satisfy humankinds’s most basic yearnings—and by doing so made themselves indispensable. For, just as we’ve benefited from these plants, the plants, in the grand co-evolutionary scheme that Pollan evokes so brilliantly, have done well by us. The sweetness of apples, for example, induced the early Americans to spread the species, giving the tree a whole new continent in which to blossom. So who is really domesticating whom?

Weaving fascinating anecdotes and accessible science into gorgeous prose, Pollan takes us on an absorbing journey that will change the way we think about our place in nature.
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.