Community action and planning: Contexts, drivers and outcomes

Policy Press
Free sample

With trust in top-down government faltering, community-based groups around the world are displaying an ever-greater appetite to take control of their own lives and neighbourhoods. Government, for its part, is keen to embrace the projects and the planning undertaken at this level, attempting to regularise it and use it as a means of reconnecting to citizens and localising democracy. This unique book analyses the contexts, drivers and outcomes of community action and planning in a selection of case studies in the global north: from emergent neighbourhood planning in England to the community-based housing movement in New York, and from active citizenship in the Dutch new towns to associative action in Marseille. It will be a valuable resource for academic researchers and for postgraduate students on social policy, planning and community development courses.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Policy Press
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Published on
Oct 22, 2014
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9781447321224
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Public Policy / City Planning & Urban Development
Political Science / Public Policy / Regional Planning
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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