Mental disorders such as depression and anxiety are increasingly common. Yet there are too few specialists to offer help to everyone, and negative attitudes to psychological problems and their treatment discourage people from seeking it. As a result, many people never receive help for these problems. The Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions marks a turning point in the delivery of psychological treatments for people with depression and anxiety. Until recently, the only form of psychological intervention available for patients with depression and anxiety was traditional one-to-one 60 minute session therapy - usually with private practitioners for those patients who could afford it. Now Low Intensity CBT Interventions are starting to revolutionize mental health care by providing cost effective psychological therapies which can reach the vast numbers of people with depression and anxiety who did not previously have access to effective psychological treatment. The Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions is the first book to provide a comprehensive guide to Low Intensity CBT interventions. It brings together researchers and clinicians from around the world who have led the way in developing evidence-based low intensity CBT treatments. It charts the plethora of new ways that evidence-based low intensity CBT can be delivered: for instance, guided self-help, groups, advice clinics, brief GP interventions, internet-based or book-based treatment and prevention programs, with supported provided by phone, email, internet, sms or face-to-face. These new treatments require new forms of service delivery, new ways of communicating, new forms of training and supervision, and the development of new workforces. They involve changing systems and routine practice, and adapting interventions to particular community contexts. The Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions is a state-of-the-art handbook, providing low intensity practitioners, supervisors, managers commissioners of services and politicians with a practical, easy-to-read guide - indispensible reading for those who wish to understand and anticipate future directions in health service provision and to broaden access to cost-effective evidence-based psychological therapies.
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About the author

James Bennett-Levy is Associate Professor in Mental Health at Sydney University's Department of Rural Health (Northern Rivers) in northern New South Wales, Australia. As soon as he was appointed to the position, he saw the potential of low intensity CBT interventions for rural and remote communities, where access to evidence-based psychological therapies tends to be very poor. Recognising the absence of a useful low intensity CBT textbook to guide practitioners and decision makers, he initiated and co-ordinated the Oxford Guide to Low Intensity CBT Interventions. In his research work, he is one of the world's leading leading researchers on CBT training with a series of empirical and theoretical papers. David Kavanagh holds a Research Chair in the Institute of Health & Biomedical Innovation and School of Psychology & Counselling at Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane. Much of his research has been on brief or low-intensity interventions, and improvement of mental health service delivery via training and supervision. His research has included evaluations of remotely delivered treatment by mail, and more recently using the internet and text messaging. Professor Kavanagh has an extensive record of research funding and publications, and his work is widely cited. He is currently on the Academy of the National Health and Medical Research Council, and the Science, Academia and Research Advisory Group of the Australian Psychological Society. He is co-chair of the Queensland Health Collaborative on Alcohol and Other Drugs and Mental Health, and serves on state and Commonwealth consultative committees on services for mental disorders and substance misuse. Mark Lau is a Research Scientist and Director, BC Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Network with BC Mental Health and Addiction Services, an agency of the Provincial Health Services Authority where he is co-ordinating a series of projects to disseminate CBT across the province of BC. He is also a Clinical Associate Professor of Psychiatry at UBC and a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Lau's research interests include evaluating effective methods of CBT dissemination, investigating the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), and the further development and validation of the Toronto Mindfulness Scale. In addition, Dr. Lau has led workshops in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and MBCT across Canada, in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia. David A Richards is Professor of Mental Health Services Research at Exeter University's Mood Disorders Centre in the UK. Throughout his career, he has tirelessly campaigned to improve access to evidence-based therapies such as CBT. He has been involved in the UK's Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme from its inception in 2005 and developed the low-intensity CBT methods used by IAPT on behalf of the UK Department of Health. As such he can be credited with personally establishing a completely new profession of low-intensity CBT workers in the UK, now known as Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners. In his spare time he runs a multi-centre research team funded by the Medical Research Council and the National Institute for Health Research which develops and tests new models of delivering treatment in clinical trials - including stepped care, guided self-help and collaborative care. Lee Ritterband is an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia Health System Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences and Director of the Behavioral Health and Technology program area. With degrees in clinical psychology and computer science/technology, Dr. Ritterband specializes in the development and testing of behaviorally-based treatment programs delivered via the Web. Over the past decade, Dr. Ritterband has established himself as one of the leading researchers in Internet health interventions. He has been a Principal or Co-Investigator on many large research projects funded by the National Institutes of Health. In 2003, Dr. Ritterband was honored with the award, Best eHealth Research Paper of the Year, sponsored by the Health e-Technologies Initiative, National Program Office of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for eHealth. Chris Williams is Professor of Psychosocial Psychiatry at the University of Glasgow, UK. He became interested in low intensity working in the mid-1990's when he completed a postgraduate CBT course, but found he struggled to offer one hour CBT appointments in his everyday work. He sees low intensity working as bringing together two themes he is particularly interested in - CBT and education/teaching - and views CBT as a self-help form of psychotherapy. He researches CBT self-help in psychiatric and community settings and has developed a range of book-based, DVD, class-based and computer-delivered self-help resources including the free access www.livinglifetothefull.com website which receives around 2 million hits a month. His work developing the five areas model of CBT is focused on making CBT accessible to practitioners and the general public alike. Together his CBT self-help books are amongst the most used in the UK. He is Patron of the charities Anxiety UK and Triumph over Phobia. Jim White is a consultant clinical psychologist and currently leads the STEPS primary care mental health team in south-east Glasgow. He has mainly worked in primary care settings and has a reputation for innovation in his approach to common mental health problems. In particular, he is interested in getting to much larger numbers of people a lot sooner, empowering them to make real choices about how they want to tackle their problems and to work with them in ensuring they are able to act on their choices. The STEPS approach is possibly one of the most radical approaches in primary care mental health in Britain. We are a Scottish Executive Exemplar Project. STEPS offers a 6 level stepped-care approach: § Individual therapy § Group work § Single contacts § Non-face-to-face interventions § Working with others § Awareness raising / community involvement / early intervention and prevention Britt Klein is the Co-Director of the National eTherapy Centre; the Co-Director of the Swin-PsyCHE e-Therapy Unit; and an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Life and Social Sciences at Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia. Since 1998 she has been developing and evaluating internet-based mental and physical health interventions as a means to increase access to health services by utilising low intensity CBT intervention modalities. Her biggest achievement to date is the co-creation of Anxiety Online (www.anxietyonline.org.au): a full service education and training, online psychological assessment and treatment clinic for the anxiety disorders open to the general public. She has been awarded numerous grants to develop and evaluate internet-based wellbeing, prevention and treatment programs, has published widely, teaches and supervises students in the field of internet interventions and she is the Co-Editor of the e-Journal of Applied Psychology.
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Additional Information

Publisher
OUP Oxford
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Published on
May 13, 2010
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Pages
632
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ISBN
9780191029356
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Medical / Psychiatry / General
Psychology / Clinical Psychology
Psychology / Psychopathology / General
Psychology / Psychotherapy / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Imagery is one of the new, exciting frontiers in cognitive therapy. From the outset of cognitive therapy, its founder Dr. Aaron T. Beck recognised the importance of imagery in the understanding and treatment of patient's problems. However, despite Beck's prescience, clinical research on imagery, and the integration of imagery interventions into clinical practice, developed slowly. It is only in the past 10 years that most writing and research on imagery in cognitive therapy has been conducted. The Oxford Guide to Imagery in Cognitive Therapy is a landmark book, which will play an important role in the next phase of cognitive therapy's development. Clinicians and researchers are starting to recognise the centrality of imagery in the development, maintenance and treatment of psychological disorders - for example, in social phobia, agoraphobia, depression, PTSD, eating disorders, childhood trauma, and personality disorder. In the fields of cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, researchers are identifying the key role that imagery plays in emotion, cognition and psychopathology. The Oxford Guide to Imagery in Cognitive Therapy has been written both for clinicians and researchers. For clinicians, it is a user-friendly, practical guide to imagery, which will enable therapists to understand imagery phenomenology, and to integrate imagery-based interventions into their cognitive therapy practice. For researchers, it provides a state-of-the-art summary of imagery research, and points the way to future studies. Written by three well-respected CBT researcher-clinicians, it is essential reading for all cognitive therapists, who have recognised the limitations of purely 'verbal' CBT techniques, and want to find new ways to work with clients with psychological disorders.
In reviewing the Contents of this Handbook edited by Freeman, Simon, Beutler, and Arkowitz, I am both impressed and gratified with the enormous strides made by cognitive behavior therapy since the late 1960s. A perusal of the Contents reveals that it is used with adults, children, couples, and families; it is clinically appropriate for such problems as anxiety, depression, sexual dysfunctions, and addictions; and it is employed in conjunction with psy chopharmacological and other psychotherapeutic interventions. It was in the mid-1960s when Breger and McGaugh published an article in the Psychological Bulletin, taking behavior therapists to task for using only classical and operant principles in devising their therapeutic interventions. Breger and McGaugh argued that the field of learning was undergoing a major revolution, paying considerably more attention to cognitive processes than had previously been the case. In short, they criticized the growing behavioral orientation for being limited in its exclusively peripheralistic orientation. At the time, behavior therapists were initially somewhat resistant to any allusion to cognitive metaphors. Indeed, my own initial reactions to the Breger and McGaugh article was quite negative. Yet, in rereading their critique, many of their suggestions now seem most appealing. No doubt, I and my behavior colleagues lacked the appropriate "cognitive set" for incorporating such contradictory information. Nonetheless, the clinical evidence for the rele vance of cognitive factors in the behavior change process was simply too compelling to ignore.
The business of cognitive therapy is to transform meanings. What better way to achieve this than through a metaphor? Metaphors straddle two different domains at once, providing a conceptual bridge from a problematic interpretation to a fresh new perspective that can cast one's experiences in a new light. Even the simplest metaphor can be used again and again with different clients, yet still achieve the desired effect. One such example is the 'broken leg' metaphor for depression. Clients with depression are understandably frustrated with their symptoms. They may often push themselves to get better or tell themselves that they should be better by now. As a therapist, it is fair to ask, would the client be so harsh and demanding on herself after getting a broken leg? A broken leg needs time to heal and you need to begin to walk on it gradually as it builds up in strength. "You can't run before you can walk", and if you try, you are likely to make it worse. For many clients this simple metaphor is enlightening, changing their view of their symptoms as a sign of their own laziness and worthlessness, to a view of them as part of an understandable illness, that while open to improvement, cannot get better over night. This book shows just how metaphors can be used productively in CBT as an integral part of the treatment. It describes the use of metaphors for a wide range of problems, including anxiety and depression, and provides countless examples of metaphors that have been used by others in CBT. It brings together in one place hundreds of metaphors that experienced therapists have used to great success. It will be a valuable sourcebook for all cognitive behaviour therapists, as well as those training in CBT.
Do you know someone who is overly arrogant, shows an extreme lack of empathy, or exhibits an inflated sense of entitlement? Do they exploit others, or engage in magical thinking? These are all traits of narcissistic personality disorder, and when it comes to dealing with narcissists, it can be difficult to get your point across. So how do you handle the narcissistic people in your life? You might interact with them in social or professional settings, and you might even love one—so ignoring them isn’t really a practical solution. They're frustrating, and maybe even intimidating, but ultimately, you need to find a way of communicating effectively with them.

Disarming the Narcissist, Second Edition, will show you how to move past the narcissist's defenses using compassionate, empathetic communication. You'll learn how narcissists view the world, how to navigate their coping styles, and why, oftentimes, it's sad and lonely being a narcissist. By learning to anticipate and avoid certain hot-button issues, you'll be able to relate to narcissists without triggering aggression. By validating some common narcissistic concerns, you'll also find out how to be heard in conversation with a narcissist.

This book will help you learn to meet your own needs while side-stepping unproductive power struggles and senseless arguments with someone who is at the center of his or her own universe. This new edition also includes new chapters on dealing with narcissistic women, aggressive and abusive narcissists, strategies for safety, and the link between narcissism and sex addiction.

Finally, you'll learn how to set limits with your narcissist and when it's time to draw the line on unacceptable behavior.
The release of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Version 5 (DSM-5) marked one of the biggest changes to the field of mental health diagnosis in over 20 years. DSM-5 Insanely Simplified provides a summary of key concepts of the new diagnostic schema including a section on the upcoming ICD-10. DSM-5 Insanely Simplified utilizes a variety of devices to help clinicians memorize complex criteria and ideas about the different diagnoses. Cartoons, mnemonic devices, and summary tables allow clinicians and students to quickly grasp and retain broad concepts and subtle nuances related to psychiatric diagnosis. DSM-5 Insanely Simplified fosters quick mastery of the most important concepts introduced in DSM-5 while offering an entirely new way of looking at mental health along a continuum. This new approach avoids simply "labeling" clients by placing them along spectrums that range from normal to problematic symptoms. Mental health professionals as well as laymen interested in a deeper understanding of emotional well-being will appreciate the synthesis of deep psychology and modern approaches to diagnosis.

Steven Buser trained in medicine at Duke University and served 12 years as a physician in the US Air Force. He is a graduate of the two-year Clinical Training Program at the CG Jung Institute of Chicago and is a co-founder of the Asheville Jung Center. In addition to a busy psychiatric private practice he serves as Publisher for Chiron Publications. He is active in the community and strives to integrate faith and spirituality into psychotherapy. He resides in the mountains in Asheville, NC with his wife and two children.

Len Cruz is the Editor-in-Chief of Chiron Publications, a book publishing company specializing in psychology, mythology, religion, and culture and a co-founder of the Asheville Jung Center. He is a psychiatrist who resides in Western North Carolina.

Luke Sloan was a 5th grade student in Asheville, NC when he completed the illustrations for this book. When he's not drawing, Luke enjoys playing soccer, reading books, snow-skiing, and just plain having fun!
In this engrossing journey into the lives of psychopaths and their infamously crafty behaviors, the renowned psychologist Kevin Dutton reveals that there is a scale of "madness" along which we all sit. Incorporating the latest advances in brain scanning and neuroscience, Dutton demonstrates that the brilliant neurosurgeon who lacks empathy has more in common with a Ted Bundy who kills for pleasure than we may wish to admit, and that a mugger in a dimly lit parking lot may well, in fact, have the same nerveless poise as a titan of industry.

Dutton argues that there are indeed "functional psychopaths" among us—different from their murderous counterparts—who use their detached, unflinching, and charismatic personalities to succeed in mainstream society, and that shockingly, in some fields, the more "psychopathic" people are, the more likely they are to succeed. Dutton deconstructs this often misunderstood diagnosis through bold on-the-ground reporting and original scientific research as he mingles with the criminally insane in a high-security ward, shares a drink with one of the world's most successful con artists, and undergoes transcranial magnetic stimulation to discover firsthand exactly how it feels to see through the eyes of a psychopath.

As Dutton develops his theory that we all possess psychopathic tendencies, he puts forward the argument that society as a whole is more psychopathic than ever: after all, psychopaths tend to be fearless, confident, charming, ruthless, and focused—qualities that are tailor-made for success in the twenty-first century. Provocative at every turn, The Wisdom of Psychopaths is a riveting adventure that reveals that it's our much-maligned dark side that often conceals the trump cards of success.

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