A Question of Balance: Charles Seeger's Philosophy of Music

Univ of California Press
Free sample

One of this century's most influential musical intellects takes center stage in Taylor Greer's meticulously wrought study of Charles Seeger (1886-1979). Seeger left an indelible mark in the fields of musicology, music criticism, ethnomusicology, and avant-garde musical composition, but until now there has been no extended appreciation and critique of Seeger's work as a whole, nor has an accessible guide to his texts been available.

Exploring the entire corpus of Charles Seeger's writing, A Question of Balance highlights the work of those persons who most influenced him, especially Henri Bergson, Bertrand Russell, and Ralph Perry. Invited to inaugurate the music department at the University of California's Berkeley campus in 1912, Seeger became keenly aware of his deficiencies in general education and put himself on a rigorous regimen of intellectual development that included studying history, anthropology, political theory, and philosophy. For the remainder of his life his ideas about music heavily influenced the development of ethnomusicology and systematic musicology.

Charles Seeger is perhaps best known as the father of the folk singers Pete, Mike, and Peggy Seeger and as the husband of the innovative American composer Ruth Crawford. This book makes clear that Seeger was an extremely important thinker and educator in his own right. Seeger's intellectual curiosity was as eclectic as it was enthusiastic, and Greer skillfully weaves together the connections Seeger made between music, the humanities, and the sciences. The result is a luminous tapestry depicting Seeger's ideal schemes of musicology. At the same time it reflects the turbulence and vitality in American musical life during the early decades of the century.
Read more
Collapse

About the author

Taylor Aitken Greer is Associate Professor of Music at Pennsylvania State University.

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Univ of California Press
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 22, 1998
Read more
Collapse
Pages
278
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9780520920132
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Biography & Autobiography / Music
Music / Ethnomusicology
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Scholarly Research for Musicians presents a range of research methods and techniques, incorporating both the common elements of traditional music research methodologies with innovative research strategies endemic to the fields of social science, education, and performance science. The author’s collaborative and interdisciplinary approach reinforces the belief that research is most palpable and successful when accessed through a relevant and meaningful way of organizing thoughts and knowledge.

Drawing from over twenty years of classroom experience, the author organizes the text into five units: Common Bases, Qualitative Research, Quantitative Research, Performance Science, and Review. Research is presented as an accessible process, one facilitated by brainstorming and question-asking, the systematic collection of information, and the analysis and synthesis of information—all with the aim to develop a succinct conceptual framework. In explicating this process, the author introduces traditional Western thought alongside contemporary and Eastern philosophy. Experts in the field of performance science explore novel approaches to studying the audience, incorporating various measuring devices and methods. In the final chapter, the author offers strategies for disseminating and publishing research reports.

Scholarly Research for Musicians demystifies the research process for musicians and music students alike, demonstrating the common principles of cohesive research plans. PowerPoint presentations are available to instructors, covering chapter discussion points in summary format. This text explores interdisciplinary methods that merge with and focus on the study of music while emphasizing concepts and materials relevant to all types of research.

Music and/as Process brings together ideas about music and the notion of process from different sub-fields within musicology and from related fields in the creative arts as a whole. These can be loosely categorised into three broad areas – composition, performance and analysis – but work in all three of these groups in the volume overlaps into the others, covers a broad range of other musicological sub-fields, and draws inspiration from, non-musicological fields. Music and/as Process comprises chapters written by a mix of scholars; some are leaders in their field and some are newer researchers, but all share an innovative and forward-thinking attitude to music research, often not well represented within ‘traditional’ musicology. Much of the work represented here started as papers or discussions at one of the Royal Musical Association (RMA) Music and/as Process Study Group Annual Conferences.

The first section of the book deals with the analysis of performance and the performance of analysis. The historical nature of music and the recognition of pieces as musical ‘works’ in the traditional sense is questioned by the authors, and is a factor in the analyses which address processes in composing, performing, and listening, and the links between these, in three very different but interlinking ways. These three approaches posit new directions and territory for musical analysis. The second section builds on the first, framing performance and/as process from the individual perspectives of the authors and their experiences as practitioners. Music by Berio, de Falla, music by the authors and their collaborators, and music composed for the authors are explored through looking at processes of interpretation and risk; processes which further undermine the ontology of the musical ‘work’ as traditionally understood, and bring the practitioner as active agent to the foreground of an examination of musical discourse. The third section encounters and questions the musical ‘work’ at its inception, exploring composition and/as process through its encounters with performance, analysis, collaboration, improvisation, translation, experimentation and cross-disciplinarity. Through explorations of new music, the way in which practitioners relate to music frame a personal and reflective account of the creative process, finally looking beyond music to musicology.

A Tribe Called Quest • Beastie Boys • De La Soul • Eric B. & Rakim • The Fugees • KRS-One • Pete Rock & CL Smooth • Public Enemy • The Roots • Run-DMC • Wu-Tang Clan • and twenty-five more hip-hop immortals

It’s a sad fact: hip-hop album liners have always been reduced to a list of producer and sample credits, a publicity photo or two, and some hastily composed shout-outs. That’s a damn shame, because few outside the game know about the true creative forces behind influential masterpieces like PE’s It Takes a Nation of Millions. . ., De La’s 3 Feet High and Rising, and Wu-Tang’s Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers). A longtime scribe for the hip-hop nation, Brian Coleman fills this void, and delivers a thrilling, knockout oral history of the albums that define this dynamic and iconoclastic art form.

The format: One chapter, one artist, one album, blow-by-blow and track-by-track, delivered straight from the original sources. Performers, producers, DJs, and b-boys–including Big Daddy Kane, Muggs and B-Real, Biz Markie, RZA, Ice-T, and Wyclef–step to the mic to talk about the influences, environment, equipment, samples, beats, beefs, and surprises that went into making each classic record. Studio craft and street smarts, sonic inspiration and skate ramps, triumph, tragedy, and take-out food–all played their part in creating these essential albums of the hip-hop canon.

Insightful, raucous, and addictive, Check the Technique transports you back to hip-hop’s golden age with the greatest artists of the ’80s and ’90s. This is the book that belongs on the stacks next to your wax.

“Brian Coleman’s writing is a lot like the albums he covers: direct, uproarious, and more than six-fifths genius.”
–Jeff Chang, author of Can’t Stop Won’t Stop

“All producers and hip-hop fans must read this book. It really shows how these albums were made and touches the music fiend in everyone.”
–DJ Evil Dee of Black Moon and Da Beatminerz

“A rarity in mainstream publishing: a truly essential rap history.”
–Ronin Ro, author of Have Gun Will Travel
©2019 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.