Understanding A Tale of Two Cities: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents

Greenwood Publishing Group
Free sample

A Tale of Two Cities, does not waste a word in telling a humanly touching, suspenseful tale against the background of one of the most bloody events in history, the French Revolution. This collection of historical documents, collateral readings, and commentary will promote interdisciplinary study of the novel and enrich the student's understanding of the French Revolution and the significant issues it raised. Newlin, the author of Everyone in Dickens and Every Thing in Dickens, has assembled a rich variety of materials. These include excerpts from Thomas Carlyle's work, The French Revolution (along with a discussion of Dickens's debt to that work), primary documents on mob behavior, the Fall of the Bastille, Thomas Paine and The Rights of Man, due process of law, capital punishment and the development of the guillotine, prison isolation, human dissection and grave robbing, voices from prison during the Terror, and colorful extracts from the writings of travelers, victims, and executioners. A detailed chronology of the French Revolution, interwoven with fictional events from A Tale of Two Cities, and sketches of major political, military, and financial figures of the Revolution, will help the student to place the novel in historical context. France's Declaration of the Rights of Man is compared in detail with the American Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

Each section of the casebook contains study questions, topics for research papers and class discussion, and lists of further reading for examining the events and issues of the novel. A glossary of terms unfamiliar to contemporary readers will help elucidate the text of A Tale of Two Cities. This is an ideal companion for teacher use and student research in interdisciplinary, English, and world history courses.

Read more
Collapse

About the author

GEORGE NEWLIN is the compiler and editor of the three-volume Everyone in Dickens (Greenwood Press, 1995) and of Every Thing in Dickens (Greenwood Press, 1996). He is now preparing a student casebook in the Literature in Context series on Great Expectations. His next major anthological work will be a multivolume series on Anthony Trollope. George Newlin has spent his professional career combining activities in law and finance with volunteer service in the arts and serious avocational musical performance. In 1988 he began developing his concept for a new kind of literary anthology, beginning with the works of Charles Dickens.

Read more
Collapse
Loading...

Additional Information

Publisher
Greenwood Publishing Group
Read more
Collapse
Published on
Dec 31, 1998
Read more
Collapse
Pages
252
Read more
Collapse
ISBN
9780313299391
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Read more
Collapse
Language
English
Read more
Collapse
Genres
Literary Criticism / European / English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh
Study Aids / Book Notes
Read more
Collapse
Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
Read more
Collapse
Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
Read more
Collapse
Eligible for Family Library

Reading information

Smartphones and Tablets

Install the Google Play Books app for Android and iPad/iPhone. It syncs automatically with your account and allows you to read online or offline wherever you are.

Laptops and Computers

You can read books purchased on Google Play using your computer's web browser.

eReaders and other devices

To read on e-ink devices like the Sony eReader or Barnes & Noble Nook, you'll need to download a file and transfer it to your device. Please follow the detailed Help center instructions to transfer the files to supported eReaders.
Until now, there has never been a work on Charles Dickens which has reflected absolutely everything he published, including his journalism and collaborative efforts. And never before has his oeuvre been arranged in the strictest practicable chronological order. Five hundred twenty-eight titles are dealt with in Everyone in Dickens, a three-volume reference set including: 5,200 individual character entries in Volumes I and II; 13,000 different figures reflected in Volume III; 293 illustrations associated with the earliest issuances of the works; and a series of 12 one-of-a-kind indexes covering characters by name, characters by family relationship, all historical persons mentioned, and much more. The set was created for people--students, scholars, and just readers--who would like to be able to find beloved Dickens characters quickly, discover new ones, and have a trove of accessible data on the man and his creations from which to embark on their own explorations and develop their own conclusions. Everyone in Dickens organizes the characters and nonfictional figures created or mentioned by Charles Dickens by work and within each work by importance. There are Principal Characters, Supporting Roles, Other Characters, Walk-ons, and Spear-carriers. Only Dickens' words are used, so the reader can enjoy each character in the round. Also provided are a plot or subject summary of each work, an abbreviation key, and publication information. Volume I covers all of Dickens' works from 1833-49, Volume II covers 1850-70, and Volume III includes indexes, tabulations, and original essays. Everyone in Dickens has had the benefit of input from some of the world's most eminent Dickensian scholars, and every effort has been made to make it the state of the art within its parameters. The collection has been endorsed by the Dickens Project at the University of California and has been praised by many experts. America's distinguished Dickens biographer, Fred Kaplan, has written the foreword, and the Curator of the Dickens House in London, David Parker, has written the preface.
Until now, there has never been a work on Charles Dickens which has reflected absolutely everything he published, including his journalism and collaborative efforts. And never before has his oeuvre been arranged in the strictest practicable chronological order. Five hundred twenty-eight titles are dealt with in Everyone in Dickens, a three-volume reference set including: 5,200 individual character entries in Volumes I and II; 13,000 different figures reflected in Volume III; 293 illustrations associated with the earliest issuances of the works; and a series of 12 one-of-a-kind indexes covering characters by name, characters by family relationship, all historical persons mentioned, and much more. The set was created for people--students, scholars, and just readers--who would like to be able to find beloved Dickens characters quickly, discover new ones, and have a trove of accessible data on the man and his creations from which to embark on their own explorations and develop their own conclusions. Everyone in Dickens organizes the characters and nonfictional figures created or mentioned by Charles Dickens by work and within each work by importance. There are Principal Characters, Supporting Roles, Other Characters, Walk-ons, and Spear-carriers. Only Dickens' words are used, so the reader can enjoy each character in the round. Also provided are a plot or subject summary of each work, an abbreviation key, and publication information. Volume I covers all of Dickens' works from 1833-49, Volume II covers 1850-70, and Volume III includes indexes, tabulations, and original essays. Everyone in Dickens has had the benefit of input from some of the world's most eminent Dickensian scholars, and every effort has been made to make it the state of the art within its parameters. The collection has been endorsed by the Dickens Project at the University of California and has been praised by many experts. America's distinguished Dickens biographer, Fred Kaplan, has written the foreword, and the Curator of the Dickens House in London, David Parker, has written the preface.
More than one hundred years after being written, Great Expectations is still one of the most widely studied works of fiction. This casebook of historical documents, collateral readings and essays brings to life both Dickens' masterpiece and the social issues surrounding his work. The interdisciplinary approach offers students insight into the historically significant issues, such as child welfare, that ignited Dickens' creative and moral sensibilities. Newlin has unearthed significant documentation on the dilemma of Victorian women, supplying original social commentary such as Mary Wollstonecraft's 1792 A Vindication of the Rights of Women, and John Stuart Mill's 1861 The Subjection of Women. This work also addresses the transportation and deportation of convicts with first-hand accounts of the treatment of prisoners. Original materials describing the significance of class distinctions, with demographic data from 1834, point up the socio-economic gaps that stratified Victorian society. Other primary documents describe the physical settings such as the Marsh Country and the river, and Bow Street in London, that figure prominently in Great Expectations. This collection of sources will help broaden students' understanding of Great Expectations and places it within its historical context.

A literary analysis chapter introduces students to the important themes and various writing techniques employed by Dickens. Each subsequent chapter offers original essays and explication of historical documents on significant issues. Each section concludes with thought-provoking study questions, topics for research, and lists of suggested readings. This volume will enhance students' reading of this classic and will facilitate further research for student and teacher alike.

©2020 GoogleSite Terms of ServicePrivacyDevelopersArtistsAbout Google|Location: United StatesLanguage: English (United States)
By purchasing this item, you are transacting with Google Payments and agreeing to the Google Payments Terms of Service and Privacy Notice.