Arming without Aiming: India's Military Modernization

Brookings Institution Press
Free sample

India has long been motivated to modernize its military, and it now has the resources. But so far, the drive to rebuild has lacked a critical component—strategic military planning. India's approach of arming without strategic purpose remains viable, however, as it seeks great-power accommodation of its rise and does not want to appear threatening. What should we anticipate from this effort in the future, and what are the likely ramifications? Stephen Cohen and Sunil Dasgupta answer those crucial questions in a book so timely that it reached number two on the nonfiction bestseller list in India.

"Two years after the publication of Arming without Aiming, our view is that India's strategic restraint and its consequent institutional arrangement remain in place. We do not want to predict that India's military-strategic restraint will last forever, but we do expect that the deeper problems in Indian defense policy will continue to slow down military modernization."—from the preface to the paperback edition

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About the author

Stephen P. Cohen is a senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution. His previous books include The Idea of Pakistan and India: Emerging Power (both with Brookings). Sunil Dasgupta is director of the University of Maryland–Baltimore County's Political Science Program at the Universities at Shady Grove, and a non resident senior fellow at Brookings.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Brookings Institution Press
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Published on
Jan 14, 2013
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Pages
223
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ISBN
9780815724926
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Language
English
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Genres
History / Military / Strategy
Political Science / International Relations / Arms Control
Political Science / World / Asian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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India is growing into one of Asia’s most important military powers. Its defence budget has more than doubled in the past decade, and it imports more arms than anyone else in the world. But India is still seen as a land power focused on long, disputed and militarised borders with Pakistan and China rather than the global military force it was in the first half of the twentieth century under British rule. Is this changing? India is acquiring increasing numbers of key platforms – aircraft carriers, amphibious ships, refuelling tankers and transport aircraft – that are extending its reach to the Indian Ocean littoral and beyond. But most accounts of this build-up have been impressionistic and partial.

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