Foundations of Design (2nd Edition)

Tempe Digital
Free sample

Foundations of Design by Jeff Davis provides a straightforward examination of the basic principles of two-dimensional design. Written in a clear and concise style, this textbook presents the elements of design in a logical order, with each chapter building on the next. The book employs a highly visual design with numerous diagrams that elegantly illustrate the fundamental design concepts. The diagrams are paired with relevant examples of contemporary art that connect theory to application.

Foundations of Design has been written to be accessible by anyone with an interest in art or design. The efficient, practical approach provides useful guidance for beginning students and practicing professionals alike. The universal ideas on visual communication are appropriate for any creative field, including fine art, graphic design, advertising, illustration, web design, and photography.

Foundations of Design is an essential addition to any art and design library.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1 - Design 
Chapter 2 - Format
Chapter 3 - Line
Chapter 4 - Shape
Chapter 5 - Size
Chapter 6 - Color
Chapter 7 - Texture
Chapter 8 - Composition
Chapter 9 - Space
Chapter 10 - Grouping
Chapter 11 - Contrast
Chapter 12 - Balance
Chapter 13 - Emphasis
Chapter 14 - Movement
Chapter 15 - Unity
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About the author

Jeff Davis currently serves as program director for the Art Foundations department at the Art Institute of Pittsburgh–Online Division, where he leads faculty and curriculum development. Prior to his role as program director, Jeff served as a faculty member teaching courses in design fundamentals and color theory. He is also the author of Foundations of Color, an introductory color theory textbook for art and design students.

Jeff is a practicing digital artist and has exhibited his work throughout the United States. He received his BA degree in Mathematics and Studio Art from Lawrence University and his MFA degree in Painting and Drawing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. He currently lives in Tempe, Arizona with his wife and two children.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Tempe Digital
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Published on
Apr 7, 2016
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Pages
150
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ISBN
9780986163746
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Art / General
Design / General
Design / Graphic Arts / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Reading information

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Foundations of Color by Jeff Davis provides a straightforward examination of the major topics of color theory. Written in a clear and concise style, this text presents the basic concepts of color in a logical order, with each chapter building on the next. The book employs a highly visual design with numerous diagrams that elegantly illustrate each color principle. The diagrams are paired with relevant examples of contemporary art that connect theory to application. 

Foundations of Color has been written to be accessible by anyone with an interest in art or design. The efficient, practical approach provides useful guidance for beginning students and practicing professionals alike. Bridging traditional color theory with modern and digital applications, this book is appropriate for any creative field, including fine art, graphic design, interior design, fashion, photography, and web design.

Foundations of Color is an essential addition to any art and design library. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1 - Color provides an introduction to the phenomenon of color, the physics of light, and color vision.
Chapter 2 - Hue examines the defining property of hue and explores the idea of color temperature through warm and cool hues.
Chapter 3 - Value examines the defining property of value and explores the use of a value scale for measuring normal value.
Chapter 4 - Saturation examines the defining property of saturation, from chromatic to neutral to achromatic colors. It also discusses the color variations of tints, tones, and shades.
Chapter 5 - Color Systems outlines systems for organizing color, from traditional paint to contemporary additive and subtractive systems. Primary, secondary, and tertiary hues are identified and organized into a color wheel for each color system.
Chapter 6 - Color Schemes explores methods for developing color schemes, including monochromatic, analogous, and complementary relationships. Additional combinations focusing on hue, value, and saturation are examined for achieving color harmony.
Chapter 7 - Color Interaction explores the interaction of color and effects such as afterimage, simultaneous contrast, optical mixing, and vibration.
Chapter 8 - Color Composition concludes by reviewing the compositional effects of color. Topics include color's impact on emphasis, balance, space, and unity.
ABOUT THE BOOK

A Framework for Understanding Poverty provides important insight into the nation’s ongoing difficulty educating poor children. Students from impoverished backgrounds at all levels of America’s education system achieve success at lower rates than students who are not impoverished.

The author, Ruby Payne, suggests that individuals who have experienced generational poverty—that is, individuals whose parents also grew up in poverty—behave in certain characteristics ways that put them at a disadvantage in institutional settings like public school. Payne defines generational poverty as different from “situational poverty,” that is the condition of poverty caused by lack of resources due to a particular event like death, chronic illness, or divorce. The idea is that raising oneself out of situational poverty is easier that raising oneself out of generational poverty.

MEET THE AUTHOR

Jeff Davis is a life long educator with a Ph.D. in English Studies who has taught at both the high school and university levels. He is also an artist and an amateur anthropologist who is a proponent of “First Art,” that art which our ancient ancestors practiced some 30,000 years ago and even earlier. His most recent book, The First-Generation Student Experience, expanded the college student-affairs field describing the challenges of contemporary nontraditional students. Related to his interest in evolutionary biology, he is currently working on a writing pedagogy book that argues that motivation is the most important dimension of the creative process, even more important than skill and native ability.

EXCERPT FROM THE BOOK

Payne establishes her working definition of poverty as “the extent to which an individual does without resources” such as financial, emotional, mental, spiritual, physical, support systems, relationships/role models, and knowledge of hidden rules (8). The challenge for the school or work setting is to analyze and understand the available resources before problem solving and to utilize opportunities that impact the non-financial resources.

She describes “three aspects of language: registers of language, discourse patterns, and story structure (27). Registers of language include frozen, formal, consultative, casual, and intimate. Dropping down one register in the same conversation is socially acceptable; dropping down two registers is socially offensive.

Buy a copy to keep reading!

More first-generation students are attending college than ever before, and policy makers agree that increasing their participation in higher education is a matter of priority.

Despite this, there is no agreed definition about the term, few institutions can quantify how many first-generation students are enrolled, or mistakenly conflate them with low-income students, and many important dimensions to the first-generation student experience remain poorly documented. Few institutions have in place a clear, well-articulated practice for assisting first-generation students to succeed.

Given that first-generation students comprise over 40% of incoming freshmen, increasing their retention and graduation rates can dramatically increase an institution’s overall retention and graduation rates, and enhance its image and desirability.

It is clearly in every institution’s self-interest to ensure its first-generation students succeed, to identify and count them, and understand how to support them. This book provides high-level administrators with a plan of action for deans to create the awareness necessary for meaningful long-term change, sets out a campus acclimation process, and provides guidelines for the necessary support structures.

At the heart of the book are 14 first-person narratives – by first-generation students spanning freshman to graduate years – that help the reader get to grips with the variety of ethnic and economic categories to which they belong. The book concludes by defining 14 key issues that institutions need to address, and offers a course of action for addressing them.

This book is intended for everyone who serves these students – faculty, academic advisors, counselors, student affairs professionals, admissions officers, and administrators – and offers a set of best practices for how two- and four-year institutions can improve the success of their first-generation student populations.

An ACPA Publication
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