Deconstructing Privilege: Teaching and Learning as Allies in the Classroom

Routledge
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Although scholarly examinations of privilege have increased in recent decades, an emphasis on privilege studies pedagogy remains lacking within institutions. This edited collection explores best practices for effective teaching and learning about various forms of systemic group privilege such as that based on race, gender, sexuality, religion, and class. Formatted in three easy-to-follow sections, Deconstructing Privilege charts the history of privilege studies and provides intersectional approaches to the topic.

Drawing on a wealth of research and real-life accounts, this book gives educators both the theoretical foundations they need to address issues of privilege in the classroom and practical ways to forge new paths for critical dialogues in educational settings. Combining interdisciplinary contributions from leading experts in the field-- such as Tim Wise and Abby Ferber-- with pedagogical strategies and tips for teaching about privilege, Deconstructing Privilege is an essential book for any educator who wants to address what privilege really means in the classroom.

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About the author

Kim A. Case is Associate Professor of Psychology and Women’s Studies, Director of the Applied Social Issues graduate sub-plan, and Director of the Teaching-Learning Enhancement Center at the University of Houston-Clear Lake, Houston, Texas, USA.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Routledge
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Published on
Jun 26, 2013
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Pages
244
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ISBN
9781136176166
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Language
English
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Genres
Education / General
Education / Multicultural Education
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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