Left and Right: The Great Dichotomy Revisited

Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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The “great dichotomy” between left and right has been a feature of pluralist politics since its emergence in modern times. Left and right are also central to the understanding of the political history of the twentieth century and may be gaining renewed visibility in the context of the current economic crisis, both in Europe and beyond. Should scholars think, once again, with and within the dichotomy, or can they think better beyond its strictures? The contributions to this volume provide answers to these and other questions in ways that are theoretically sound and empirically informed.

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About the author

João Cardoso Rosas (MA, University of Porto; PhD EUI – Florence) is Associate Professor of Political Philosophy at the University of Minho and recurrent Visiting Professor in Lisbon and Madrid. He also has been Visiting Professor at Brown University and Visiting Research Fellow at the University of Oxford. His research interests include theories of justice, pluralism and human rights. His most recent books are Concepções da Justiça [Conceptions of Justice] and Futuro Indefinido: Ensaios de Filosofia Política [Indefinite Future: Essays in Political Philosophy]. He was president of the Portuguese Political Science Association between 2010 and 2012 and is currently president of the Portuguese Philosophical Society.

Ana Rita Ferreira is a PhD student and Researcher in Political Science at the Institute of Political Studies of the Portuguese Catholic University and at the Centre of Humanistic Studies of the University of Minho. She also has been a visiting PhD student at the University of Oxford and Visiting Professor at the Catholic University of Mozambique. She holds a BA in Communication Sciences (Journalism stream) from the Social and Human Sciences Faculty of the New University of Lisbon, and a post-graduate degree in Political Science (Political Theory branch) from the Institute of Political Studies of the Portuguese Catholic University. Her main areas of interest are political ideologies and the role of the Welfare State. Her most recent publication is Ideologias Políticas Contemporâneas: Mudanças e Permanências [Contemporary Political Ideologies: Changes and Permanencies], edited with João Cardoso Rosas.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Cambridge Scholars Publishing
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Published on
Jan 8, 2014
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Pages
430
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ISBN
9781443855709
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Best For
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Comparative Politics
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / Political Ideologies / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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Global governance is here--but not where most people think. This book presents the far-reaching argument that not only should we have a new world order but that we already do. Anne-Marie Slaughter asks us to completely rethink how we view the political world. It's not a collection of nation states that communicate through presidents, prime ministers, foreign ministers, and the United Nations. Nor is it a clique of NGOs. It is governance through a complex global web of "government networks."

Slaughter provides the most compelling and authoritative description to date of a world in which government officials--police investigators, financial regulators, even judges and legislators--exchange information and coordinate activity across national borders to tackle crime, terrorism, and the routine daily grind of international interactions. National and international judges and regulators can also work closely together to enforce international agreements more effectively than ever before. These networks, which can range from a group of constitutional judges exchanging opinions across borders to more established organizations such as the G8 or the International Association of Insurance Supervisors, make things happen--and they frequently make good things happen. But they are underappreciated and, worse, underused to address the challenges facing the world today.


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Collected here in this 4-in-1 omnibus are the most important books ever written on the art of war. The Art of War By Sun Tzu translated and commented on by Lionel Giles, On War by Carl von Clausewitz, The Art of War by Niccolò Machiavelli, and The Art of War by Baron De Jomini. These four books will give you as complete a view on the art of war as you can attain. This is the most important book ever written about warfare and conflict. Lionel Giles' translation is the definitive edition and his commentary is indispensable. The Art of War can be used and adapted in every facet of your life. This book explains when and how to go to war, as well as when not to. Learn how to win any conflict whether it be on the battlefield or in the boardroom. Although Carl von Clausewitz participated in many military campaigns, he was primarily a military theorist interested in the examination of war. On War is the West's premier work on the philosophy of war. Other soldiers before him had written treatises on various military subjects, but none undertook a great philosophical examination of war on the scale of Clausewitz's. On War is considered to be the first modern book of military strategy. This is due mainly to Clausewitz' integration of political, social, and economic issues as some of the most important factors in deciding the outcomes of a war. It is one of the most important treatises on strategy ever written, and continues to be required reading at many military academies. Niccolo Machiavelli considered this book his greatest achievement. Here you will learn how to recruit, train, motivate, and discipline an army. You will learn the difference between strategy and tactics. Machiavelli does a masterful job of breaking down and analyzing historic battles. This book of military knowledge belongs alongside Sun-Tzu and Clausewitz on every book shelf. Antoine-Henri Jomini was the most celebrated writer on the Napoleonic art of war. Jomini was present at most of the most important battles of the Napoleonic Wars. His writing, therefore, is the most authoritative on the subject. "The art of war, as generally considered, consists of five purely military branches,-viz.: Strategy, Grand Tactics, Logistics, Engineering, and Tactics. A sixth and essential branch, hitherto unrecognized, might be termed Diplomacy in its relation to War. Although this branch is more naturally and intimately connected with the profession of a statesman than with that of a soldier, it cannot be denied that, if it be useless to a subordinate general, it is indispensable to every general commanding an army." -Antoine-Henri Jomini
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