Running Randomized Evaluations: A Practical Guide

Princeton University Press
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This book provides a comprehensive yet accessible guide to running randomized impact evaluations of social programs. Drawing on the experience of researchers at the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab, which has run hundreds of such evaluations in dozens of countries throughout the world, it offers practical insights on how to use this powerful technique, especially in resource-poor environments.

This step-by-step guide explains why and when randomized evaluations are useful, in what situations they should be used, and how to prioritize different evaluation opportunities. It shows how to design and analyze studies that answer important questions while respecting the constraints of those working on and benefiting from the program being evaluated. The book gives concrete tips on issues such as improving the quality of a study despite tight budget constraints, and demonstrates how the results of randomized impact evaluations can inform policy.

With its self-contained modules, this one-of-a-kind guide is easy to navigate. It also includes invaluable references and a checklist of the common pitfalls to avoid.

  • Provides the most up-to-date guide to running randomized evaluations of social programs, especially in developing countries
  • Offers practical tips on how to complete high-quality studies in even the most challenging environments
  • Self-contained modules allow for easy reference and flexible teaching and learning
  • Comprehensive yet nontechnical
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About the author

Rachel Glennerster is executive director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL) at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Kudzai Takavarasha holds degrees in chemical engineering and economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and was a policy manager at J-PAL from 2004 to 2012.
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Additional Information

Publisher
Princeton University Press
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Published on
Nov 24, 2013
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Pages
480
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ISBN
9781400848447
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Development / Economic Development
Political Science / History & Theory
Political Science / Public Policy / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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