Getting Personal: Teaching Personal Writing in the Digital Age

SUNY Press
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 Addresses how digital forms of personal writing can be most effectively used by teachers, students, and other community members.
At a time when Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Instagram, and other social media dominate our interactions with one another and with our world, the teaching of writing also necessarily involves the employment of multimodal approaches, visual literacies, and online learning. Given this new digital landscape, how do we most effectively teach and create various forms of “personal writing” within our rhetoric and composition classes, our creative writing classes, and our community groups? Contributors to Getting Personal offer their thoughts about some of the positives and negatives of teaching and using personal writing within digital contexts. They also reveal intriguing teaching activities that they have designed to engage their students and other writers. In addition, they share some of the innovative responses they have received to these assignments. Getting Personal is about finding ways to teach and use personal writing in the digital age that can truly empower writing teachers, writing students, as well as other community members.

“Getting Personal offers an engaging, comprehensive view of how and why instructors, in both creative and academic writing, can integrate contemporary writing and communication practices into their classrooms, assignments, and curricula.” — Jill Talbot, editor of Metawritings: Toward a Theory of Nonfiction

“I am right now rethinking some of my assumptions about what it means to do and to teach personal writing—especially in digital environments. I’m also taken with the fact that while the chapters are clearly academic, they are also personal, and while several of them explicitly call the ‘false binary between the personal and the academic’ into question, my sense is that they themselves do so implicitly as well.” — Barry M. Maid, coauthor of The McGraw-Hill Guide: Writing for College, Writing for Life, Fourth Edition
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About the author

 Laura Gray-Rosendale is President’s Distinguished Teaching Fellow, Director of S.T.A.R. English, and Professor of English at Northern Arizona University. She is the author of seven books, including College Girl: A Memoir and Fractured Feminisms: Rhetoric, Context, and Contestation (coedited with Gil Harootunian), both also published by SUNY Press, and Rethinking Basic Writing: Exploring Identity, Politics, and Community in Interaction.

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Additional Information

Publisher
SUNY Press
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Published on
Jan 29, 2018
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Pages
306
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ISBN
9781438468983
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Language
English
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Genres
Language Arts & Disciplines / Composition & Creative Writing
Language Arts & Disciplines / Rhetoric
Reference / Writing Skills
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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For intermediate-level courses in Integrated Reading and Writing.


A meaningful, content-driven approach to integrated reading and writing proficiency Read Think Write: True Integration Through Academic Content helps students develop the skills they need to succeed in all subsequent discipline-specific courses.


The authors start with an introduction to the reading, thinking, and writing processes and a detailed discussion of how students can get the most out of the text. Subsequent chapters are organized thematically, each covering an academic content area. This builds students’ academic vocabulary and enables them to develop and pursue academic interests.


Each discipline chapter ends with an essay assignment that asks students to integrate skills they’ve learned in the chapter and ideas from the other chapter readings. Students apply these skills by reading actively, thinking about and evaluating text, identifying the topics, main ideas, and details, making inferences, and recognizing key patterns of organization and translating these reading skills into their writing equivalents to write thoughtful, effective essays.


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Note: You are purchasing a standalone product; MySkillsLab does not come packaged with this content. Students, if interested in purchasing this title with MySkillsLab, ask your instructor for the correct package ISBN and Course ID. Instructors, contact your Pearson representative for more information.


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Who sets language policy today? Who made whom the grammar doctor? Lacking the equivalent of l'Académie française, we English speakers must find our own way looking for guidance or vindication in source after source. McGuffey's Readers introduced nineteenth-century students to "correct" English. Strunk and White's Elements of Style and William Safire's column, "On Language," provide help on diction and syntax to contemporary writers and speakers. Sister Miriam Joseph's book, The Trivium: The Liberal Arts of Logic, Grammar, and Rhetoric, invites the reader into a deeper understanding—one that includes rules, definitions, and guidelines, but whose ultimate end is to transform the reader into a liberal artist.

A liberal artist seeks the perfection of the human faculties. The liberal artist begins with the language arts, the trivium, which is the basis of all learning because it teaches the tools for reading, writing, speaking, and listening. Thinking underlies all these activities. Many readers will recognize elements of this book: parts of speech, syntax, propositions, syllogisms, enthymemes, logical fallacies, scientific method, figures of speech, rhetorical technique, and poetics. The Trivium, however, presents these elements within a philosophy of language that connects thought, expression, and reality.

"Trivium" means the crossroads where the three branches of language meet. In the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, students studied and mastered this integrated view of language. Regrettably, modern language teaching keeps the parts without the vision of the whole. Inspired by the possibility of helping students "acquire mastery over the tools of learning" Sister Miriam Joseph and other teachers at Saint Mary's College designed and taught a course on the trivium for all first year students. The Trivium resulted from that noble endeavor.

The liberal artist travels in good company. Sister Miriam Joseph frequently cites passages from William Shakespeare, John Milton, Plato, the Bible, Homer, and other great writers. The Paul Dry Books edition of The Trivium provides new graphics and notes to make the book accessible to today's readers. Sister Miriam Joseph told her first audience that "the function of the trivium is the training of the mind for the study of matter and spirit, which constitute the sum of reality. The fruit of education is culture, which Mathew Arnold defined as 'the knowledge of ourselves and the world.'" May this noble endeavor lead many to that end.

"Is the trivium, then, a sufficient education for life? Properly taught, I believe that it should be."—Dorothy L. Sayers

"The Trivium is a highly recommended and welcome contribution to any serious and dedicated writer's reference collection."—Midwest Book Review

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