Fitting In

Silver Layer Publications
Free sample

You awake from a coma to find the world strangely altered yet everyone pretending that nothing has changed. Do you pretend with the rest and try to fit in, or do you stand for reality and face social ostracism?

(Also available in the short story collection "The Wrong Sort of Stories".)

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About the author

Stephen Measure is an author of unconventional satires and strange stories.

www.stephenmeasure.com
 

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Additional Information

Publisher
Silver Layer Publications
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Published on
Jan 21, 2019
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Pages
18
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ISBN
9781940778419
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Language
English
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Genres
Fiction / Literary
Fiction / Satire
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Content Protection
This content is DRM free.
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Read Aloud
Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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