Enterprising America: Businesses, Banks, and Credit Markets in Historical Perspective

University of Chicago Press
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The rise of America from a colonial outpost to one of the world’s most sophisticated and productive economies was facilitated by the establishment of a variety of economic enterprises pursued within the framework of laws and institutions that set the rules for their organization and operation.

To better understand the historical processes central to American economic development, Enterprising America brings together contributors who address the economic behavior of American firms and financial institutions—and the associated legal institutions that shaped their behavior—throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Collectively, the contributions provide an account of the ways in which businesses, banks, and credit markets promoted America’s extraordinary economic growth. Among the topics that emerge are the rise of incorporation and its connection to factory production in manufacturing, the organization and operation of large cotton plantations in comparison with factories, the regulation and governance of banks, the transportation revolution’s influence on bank stability and survival, and the emergence of long-distance credit in the context of an economy that was growing rapidly and becoming increasingly integrated across space.
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About the author

William J. Collins is the Terence E. Adderley Jr. Professor of Economics at Vanderbilt University and a research associate of the NBER. Robert A. Margo is professor of economics at Boston University and a research associate of the NBER.
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Additional Information

Publisher
University of Chicago Press
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Published on
Sep 24, 2015
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Pages
304
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ISBN
9780226261768
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Language
English
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Genres
Business & Economics / Corporate Finance / General
Business & Economics / Economic History
Business & Economics / Economics / Macroeconomics
Business & Economics / General
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Eligible for Family Library

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"A concise, lucid account of the bases of racial inequality in the South between Reconstruction and the Civil Rights era. . . . Deserves the careful attention of anyone concerned with historical and contemporary race stratification."—Kathryn M. Neckerman, Contemporary Sociology

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A black swan is a highly improbable event with three principal characteristics: It is unpredictable; it carries a massive impact; and, after the fact, we concoct an explanation that makes it appear less random, and more predictable, than it was. The astonishing success of Google was a black swan; so was 9/11. For Nassim Nicholas Taleb, black swans underlie almost everything about our world, from the rise of religions to events in our own personal lives.
 
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Elegant, startling, and universal in its applications, The Black Swan will change the way you look at the world. Taleb is a vastly entertaining writer, with wit, irreverence, and unusual stories to tell. He has a polymathic command of subjects ranging from cognitive science to business to probability theory. The Black Swan is a landmark book—itself a black swan.
 
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“Engaging . . . The Black Swan has appealing cheek and admirable ambition.”—The New York Times Book Review
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