The New Zealand Project

Bridget Williams Books
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By any measure, New Zealand must confront monumental issues in the years ahead. From the future of work to climate change, wealth inequality to new populism – these challenges are complex and even unprecedented. Yet why does New Zealand’s political discussion seem so diminished, and our political imagination unequal to the enormity of these issues? And why is this gulf particularly apparent to young New Zealanders?

These questions sit at the centre of Max Harris’s ‘New Zealand project’. This book represents, from the perspective of a brilliant young New Zealander, a vision for confronting the challenges ahead. Unashamedly idealistic, The New Zealand Project arrives at a time of global upheaval that demands new conversations about our shared future.

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About the author

Max Harris is currently an Examination Fellow at All Souls College in Oxford. He completed a Master of Public Policy and Bachelor of Civil Law at the University of Oxford while on a New Zealand Rhodes Scholarship from 2012–2014, and a Law/Arts conjoint degree (with Honours in Law) at the University of Auckland from 2006–2010. Harris worked at the Supreme Court of New Zealand as a clerk for Chief Justice Elias in 2011–2012. He has also completed short stints of work at the South Australian Department of Premier and Cabinet (in early 2008, as a speechwriting intern), the law firm Russell McVeagh (in late 2008–2009), the Australian National University in Canberra (as a summer scholar, in late 2009–2010), the American Civil Liberties Union in New York (late 2010–2011), and Helen Clark’s Executive Office at the United Nations Development Programme (in July–August 2014).
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Additional Information

Publisher
Bridget Williams Books
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Published on
Apr 11, 2017
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Pages
332
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ISBN
9780947492595
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Language
English
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Genres
Political Science / Political Ideologies / General
Political Science / World / Australian & Oceanian
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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A comprehensive, relevant, and accessible look at all aspects ofIndigenous Australian history and culture

What is The Dreaming? How many different Indigenous tribes andlanguages once existed in Australia? What is the purpose of acorroboree? What effect do the events of the past have onIndigenous peoples today? Indigenous Australia For Dummiesanswers these questions and countless others about the oldest raceon Earth. It explores Indigenous life in Australia before 1770, theimpact of white settlement, the ongoing struggle by Aboriginal andTorres Strait Islander peoples to secure their human rights andequal treatment under the law, and much more.

Celebrating the contributions of Indigenous people tocontemporary Australian culture, the book explores Indigenous art,music, dance, literature, film, sport, and spirituality. Itdiscusses the concept of modern Indigenous identity and examinesthe ongoing challenges facing Indigenous communities today, fromhealth and housing to employment and education, land rights, andself-determination.

Explores significant political moments—such as PaulKeating's Redfern Speech and Kevin Rudd's apology, and moreProfiles celebrated people and organisations in a variety offields, from Cathy Freeman to Albert Namatjira to the BangarraDance Theatre and the National Aboriginal Radio ServiceChallenges common stereotypes about Indigenous people anddiscusses current debates, such as a land rights and inequalitiesin health and education

This book will enlighten readers of all backgrounds about thehistory, struggles and triumphs of the diverse, proud, andfascinating peoples that make up Australia's Indigenouscommunities. With a foreword by former PM Malcolm Fraser,Indigenous Australia For Dummies is a must-read account ofAustralia's first people.

'Indigenous Australia For Dummies is an importantcontribution to the broad debate and to a better understanding ofour past history. Hopefully it will influence futureevents.'—Former Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser

For centuries, the Feast of Fools has been condemned and occasionally celebrated as a disorderly, even transgressive Christian festival, in which reveling clergy elected a burlesque Lord of Misrule, presided over the divine office wearing animal masks or women's clothes, sang obscene songs, swung censers that gave off foul-smelling smoke, played dice at the altar, and otherwise parodied the liturgy of the church. Afterward, they would take to the streets, howling, issuing mock indulgences, hurling manure at bystanders, and staging scurrilous plays. The problem with this popular account—intriguing as it may be— is that it is wrong.In Sacred Folly, Max Harris rewrites the history of the Feast of Fools, showing that it developed in the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries as an elaborate and orderly liturgy for the day of the Circumcision (1 January)—serving as a dignified alternative to rowdy secular New Year festivities. The intent of the feast was not mockery but thanksgiving for the incarnation of Christ. Prescribed role reversals, in which the lower clergy presided over divine office, recalled Mary's joyous affirmation that God "has put down the mighty from their seat and exalted the humble." The "fools" represented those chosen by God for their lowly status.The feast, never widespread, was largely confined to cathedrals and collegiate churches in northern France. In the fifteenth century, high-ranking clergy who relied on rumor rather than firsthand knowledge attacked and eventually suppressed the feast. Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century historians repeatedly misread records of the feast; their erroneous accounts formed a shaky foundation for subsequent understanding of the medieval ritual. By returning to the primary documents, Harris reconstructs a Feast of Fools that is all the more remarkable for being sanctified rather than sacrilegious.
For centuries, the Feast of Fools has been condemned and occasionally celebrated as a disorderly, even transgressive Christian festival, in which reveling clergy elected a burlesque Lord of Misrule, presided over the divine office wearing animal masks or women's clothes, sang obscene songs, swung censers that gave off foul-smelling smoke, played dice at the altar, and otherwise parodied the liturgy of the church. Afterward, they would take to the streets, howling, issuing mock indulgences, hurling manure at bystanders, and staging scurrilous plays. The problem with this popular account—intriguing as it may be— is that it is wrong.In Sacred Folly, Max Harris rewrites the history of the Feast of Fools, showing that it developed in the late twelfth and early thirteenth centuries as an elaborate and orderly liturgy for the day of the Circumcision (1 January)—serving as a dignified alternative to rowdy secular New Year festivities. The intent of the feast was not mockery but thanksgiving for the incarnation of Christ. Prescribed role reversals, in which the lower clergy presided over divine office, recalled Mary's joyous affirmation that God "has put down the mighty from their seat and exalted the humble." The "fools" represented those chosen by God for their lowly status.The feast, never widespread, was largely confined to cathedrals and collegiate churches in northern France. In the fifteenth century, high-ranking clergy who relied on rumor rather than firsthand knowledge attacked and eventually suppressed the feast. Eighteenth- and nineteenth-century historians repeatedly misread records of the feast; their erroneous accounts formed a shaky foundation for subsequent understanding of the medieval ritual. By returning to the primary documents, Harris reconstructs a Feast of Fools that is all the more remarkable for being sanctified rather than sacrilegious.
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