Germanium-Based Technologies: From Materials to Devices

Elsevier
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Germanium is a semiconductor material that formed the basis for the development of transistor technology. Although the breakthrough of planar technology and integrated circuits put silicon in the foreground, in recent years there has been a renewed interest in germanium, which has been triggered by its strong potential for deep submicron (sub 45 nm) technologies. Germanium-Based technologies: From Materials to Devices is the first book to provide a broad, in-depth coverage of the field, including recent advances in Ge-technology and the fundamentals in material science, device physics and semiconductor processing. The contributing authors are international experts with a world-wide recognition and involved in the leading research in the field.

The book also covers applications and the use of Ge for optoelectronics, detectors and solar cells. An ideal reference work for students and scientists working in the field of physics of semiconductor devices and materials, as well as for engineers in research centres and industry. Both the newcomer and the expert should benefit from this unique book.

  • State-of-the-art information available for the first time as an all-in-source
  • Extensive reference list making it an indispensable reference book
  • Broad coverage from fundamental aspects up to industrial applications
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About the author

Eddy Simoen is a Senior Researcher at IMEC, where he is currently involved in research on the defect and strain engineering in high-mobility and epitaxial substrates and defect studies in germanium and III-V compounds.

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Additional Information

Publisher
Elsevier
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Published on
Jul 28, 2011
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Pages
480
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ISBN
9780080474908
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Language
English
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Genres
Science / Physics / Condensed Matter
Science / Physics / Quantum Theory
Technology & Engineering / Materials Science / General
Technology & Engineering / Superconductors & Superconductivity
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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Available on Android devices
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Eligible for Family Library

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It is well-known, even at the most elementary level of scientific knowledge, that free surfaces have properties which make them differ from the underlying bulk material. In the case of liquids, it is common knowledge - even among laymen - that the liquid surface acts as though it were a distinct skin-like material. At a slightly more advanced level, it is known that the liquid surface will seek to minimize its total surface energy by minimizing its surface area; thereby affecting its local vapor-pressure and adsorption behavior. In the case of solids too, it has long been known that different crystallographic surfaces have different surface energies and that this can decide which surfaces ‘survive’ during crystal growth, and govern how solids - especially small particles - respond to prolonged annealing.
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