Alien Capital: Asian Racialization and the Logic of Settler Colonial Capitalism

Duke University Press
Free sample

In Alien Capital Iyko Day retheorizes the history and logic of settler colonialism by examining its intersection with capitalism and the racialization of Asian immigrants to Canada and the United States. Day explores how the historical alignment of Asian bodies and labor with capital's abstract and negative dimensions became one of settler colonialism's foundational and defining features. This alignment allowed white settlers to gloss over and expunge their complicity with capitalist exploitation from their collective memory. Day reveals this process through an analysis of a diverse body of Asian North American literature and visual culture, including depictions of Chinese railroad labor in the 1880s, filmic and literary responses to Japanese internment in the 1940s, and more recent examinations of the relations between free trade, national borders, and migrant labor. In highlighting these artists' reworking and exposing of the economic modalities of Asian racialized labor, Day pushes beyond existing approaches to settler colonialism as a Native/settler binary to formulate it as a dynamic triangulation of Native, settler, and alien populations and positionalities. 
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About the author

Iyko Day is Associate Professor of English at Mount Holyoke College. 
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Additional Information

Publisher
Duke University Press
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Published on
Feb 25, 2016
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Pages
264
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ISBN
9780822374527
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Language
English
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Genres
Literary Criticism / American / General
Social Science / Ethnic Studies / Asian American Studies
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Content Protection
This content is DRM protected.
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